Global invasive species database

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Common name
sauce de Babilonia (Spanish), shidare-yanagi (Japanese), Wisconsin willow (English, United States), Trauerweide (French), saule pleureur (French), saule de Babylone (French), treurwilger (Afrikaans), Babylon weeping willow (English), weeping willow (English), sauce llorón (Spanish)
Synonym
Salix babylonica , var. crispa hort. ex Loudon
Similar species
Summary
The weeping willow, Salix babylonica, is native to China but has been introduced around the world as an ornamental and for erosion control. Willows can spread vegetatively and also via seed, and can easily invade streams, rivers and wetlands, as well as other intact areas. Impacts on ecosystems include modifcation of hydrology; decreased water quality and availability; habitat loss; decreased insect population, important prey for some birds and fish species; inhibition of understory plant growth; and changes in species composition. Commonly used management techniques include herbicides, e.g. glyphosphate, picloram, picloram/triclopyr; and/or mechanical control, e.g. felling, cutting, excavating.
Notes
As stated by ITIS, 2010: the two listed accepted names of Salix babylonica auct. non L. are: 1) Salix X pendulina Wenderoth commonly known as Wisconsin weeping willow [Synonyms: Salix babylonica auct. non L.; Salix X blanda Anderss. (pro sp.); Salix elegantissima K. Koch; Salix pendulina var. blanda (Anderss.) Meikle ex auct. ined.; Salix pendulina var. elegantissima (K. Koch) Meikle and
Salix X sepulcralis Simonkai. commonly known as weeping willow [Synonyms: Salix babylonica auct. non L.; Salix salomonii hort.; Salix X sepulcralis var. chrysocoma (Dode) Meikle.

Principal source:

Compiler: IUCN SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group with support from the Overseas Territories Environmental Programme (OTEP) project XOT603, a joint project with the Cayman Islands Government - Department of Environment

Review:

Publication date: 2010-10-07

Recommended citation: Global Invasive Species Database (2020) Species profile: Salix babylonica. Downloaded from http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/speciesname/Salix+babylonica on 21-01-2020.

Management Info
Commonly used management techniques include mechanical control (e.g. felling, excavating) and/or herbicides, e.g. glyphosphate, picloram, picloram/triclopyr. Herbicides can be applied by foliar spray, stem injection, and cut stump application. Repsrouting may occur. (Holland & Davies 2007).

The Willows National Management Guide: Current management and control options for Willow (Salix spp) in Australia is divided into six sections that includes detailed information on the spread and impacts of willows on riparian habitats, guidelines for how to plan a willow management programme, including when to prioritise, detailed descriptions of available control and waste management methods, including when to use specific methods. The manual also includes important information on how to sustain the programme in order to endure long term benefits, monitoring, managing erosion, re-vegetation and case studies of different methods, approaches and strategies in management.

The Weed Control Methods Handbook provides you with detailed information about the tools and techniques available for controlling invasive plants, or weeds, in natural areas. This Handbook is divided into eight chapters, covering a range of different control methods: manual, mechanical, promoting competition from native plants, grazing, biocontrol, herbicides, prescribed fire, solarization, flooding, and other, more novel, techniques. Each control method has advantages and disadvantages in terms of its effects against the target weed(s), impacts to untargeted plants and animals, risks to human health and safety, and costs.

Countries (or multi-country features) with distribution records for Salix babylonica
NATIVE RANGE
  • china
Informations on Salix babylonica has been recorded for the following locations. Click on the name for additional informations.
Lorem Ipsum
Location Status Invasiveness Occurrence Source
Details of Salix babylonica in information
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Management information
Commonly used management techniques include mechanical control (e.g. felling, excavating) and/or herbicides, e.g. glyphosphate, picloram, picloram/triclopyr. Herbicides can be applied by foliar spray, stem injection, and cut stump application. Repsrouting may occur. (Holland & Davies 2007).

The Willows National Management Guide: Current management and control options for Willow (Salix spp) in Australia is divided into six sections that includes detailed information on the spread and impacts of willows on riparian habitats, guidelines for how to plan a willow management programme, including when to prioritise, detailed descriptions of available control and waste management methods, including when to use specific methods. The manual also includes important information on how to sustain the programme in order to endure long term benefits, monitoring, managing erosion, re-vegetation and case studies of different methods, approaches and strategies in management.

The Weed Control Methods Handbook provides you with detailed information about the tools and techniques available for controlling invasive plants, or weeds, in natural areas. This Handbook is divided into eight chapters, covering a range of different control methods: manual, mechanical, promoting competition from native plants, grazing, biocontrol, herbicides, prescribed fire, solarization, flooding, and other, more novel, techniques. Each control method has advantages and disadvantages in terms of its effects against the target weed(s), impacts to untargeted plants and animals, risks to human health and safety, and costs.

Bibliography
9 references found for Salix babylonica

Managment information
IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG)., 2010. A Compilation of Information Sources for Conservation Managers.
Summary: This compilation of information sources can be sorted on keywords for example: Baits & Lures, Non Target Species, Eradication, Monitoring, Risk Assessment, Weeds, Herbicides etc. This compilation is at present in Excel format, this will be web-enabled as a searchable database shortly. This version of the database has been developed by the IUCN SSC ISSG as part of an Overseas Territories Environmental Programme funded project XOT603 in partnership with the Cayman Islands Government - Department of Environment. The compilation is a work under progress, the ISSG will manage, maintain and enhance the database with current and newly published information, reports, journal articles etc.
General information
Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS), 2010. Salix babylonica L.
Summary: Available from: http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=22503 [Accessed 26 July 2010]
Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS), 2010. Salix X pendulina Wenderoth
Summary: Available from: http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=507155 [Accessed 26 July 2010]
Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS), 2010. Salix X sepulcralis Simonkai
Summary: Available from: http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=504981 [Accessed 26 July 2010]
Varnham, K 2006. Non-native species in UK Overseas Territories: a review JNCC Report No. 372
Summary: Available from: http://www.caymanbiodiversity.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/10/jncc372_web.pdf [Accessed 9 April 2010]
Contact
The following 0 contacts offer information an advice on Salix babylonica
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