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Common name
cogadrogadro (English, Fiji), co gadrogadro (English, Fiji), tottalavaadi (Tamil), vao tuitui (Samoan), touch-me-not (English), shameplant (English), attaapatti (Telugu), shamipatra (Sanskrit), pikika'a (English, Aitutaki Atoll), marie-honte (English), action plant (English, Australia), shameweed (English, Australia), ngandrongandro (English, Fiji), morivivi (English), shamebush (English, Australia), mimosa (English, Australia), sensitive plant (English), limemeihr (English, Pohnpei Island), vergonzosa (English, Australia), humble plant (English, Australia), rakau pikika'a (English, Rarotonga Island), tita pikika'a (English, Cook Islands), dormidera (English), live and die (English, Australia), betguen sosa (English, Guam), pope ha'avare (English, Society Islands), chuimui (Hindi), samangaa (Sanskrit), sensitive grass (English), Kruidje-roer-me-niet (Dutch), lazza bati (English, Bangladesh), rakau 'avarevare (English, Ngaputoru Island), rakau pikika'a (English, Mangaia Island), tita 'avarevare (English, Miti'aro Island), Sinnpflanze (German), mechiuaiu (English, Palau), mayhont (English), honteuse (English), reesamani (Gujarati), Almindelig mimose (Danish), lajjavathi (Bengali), laajak (Bengali), Gemeine Mimose (German), tuntokasvi (Finnish), sensitive (French), Raktapaadi (Sanskrit), tita 'avarevare (English, Ma'uke Island), muttidare muni (Kannada), lajjavanthi (Hindi), namaskaar (Sanskrit), sensitiva (Spanish), lajouni (Hindi), Lajaalu (Hindi), laajari (Marathi), laajaalu (Sanskrit), thothae jegri (English, India), khadiraka (Sanskrit), sleeping grass (English), ti mawi (English), tuitui (English, Samoa), memege (English, Niue), puteri malu (English, Brunei), mateloi (English, Tonga), tho ngandrongandro (English, Fiji), vao fefe (English, Samoa), lajjalu (English, India), shamelady (English, Australia), la'au fefe (English, American Samoa/Samoa), dorme (English), pua hilahila (English, Hawaii), togop-togop (English, Sabah, Malaysia), tho kandrodandro (English, Lau Island), lajja (English, India), paope 'avare (English, Ngaputoru Island), pikika'a (English, Palmerston (Avarau) Island), rakau 'avare (English, Atiu Island), tiare pikika'a (English, Cook Islands)
Synonym
Mimosa tetranda , Humb. and Bonpl. ex Willd.
Mimosa pudica , L. var. tetranda (Willd.) DC.
Mimosa unijuga , Duch. and Walp.
Mimosa pudica , L. var. unijuga (Duch. and Walp.) Griseb
Similar species
Summary
Mimosa pudica is native to South America, but has become a pan-tropical weed. It was introduced to many countries as an ornamental plant and is still widely available for sale. Mimosa pudica has become a pest in forest plantations, cropland, orchards and pasture. Mimosa pudica is used as a medicinal plant in many regions.
Species Description
Mimosa pudica is a more or less prostrate creeper; with cylindric stems reddish-brown, prickly; leaves immediately fold by pulvini if touched or jarred; pinnae 4, often reddish; leaflets 12-25 pairs, linear, acute, bristly; 9-12mm long, 1.5mm wide; flowers pink, in globose heads, nearly 1cm in diameter, axillary, peduncle up to 2.5cm long; pods crowded, flat, prickly-bristly, indented between the few (2-4) seeds, to nearly 2cm long; seeds about 2mm broad, rounded, brown (Stone, 1970; in PIER, 2005; CSIS, undated). It may reach up to 1 metre in height, although it usually grows 15-45cm high (CSIS, undated; Francis, undated; Land Protection, 2006). It is described variously as an annual, biennial or perennial plant (Wu et al., 2003; USDA, 2006; PIER, 2005).
Notes
When touched, an Mimosa pudica plant quickly folds its leaflets and pinnae and droops downward at the petiole attachment. The leaves also droop at night, and when exposed to rain or excessive heat. This response may be a defense against herbivorous insects, leaching loss of nutrients, or desiccation (Francis, undated).

M. pudica has been identified as having potential for phytoremediation of arsenic polluted areas in Thailand (Visoottiviseth et al., 2002).
Lifecycle Stages
In Puerto Rico, M. pudica plants live 1 to 2 years. Seedlings grow slowly for 2 or 3 months and then accelerate, reaching 0.5 to 2m of extension at the end of the first year. Growth of plants that survive into the second year is much slower. Potted and fieldgrown individuals are sensitive to overwatering (Bui, 2001). This species has been successfully tested and recommended for erosion control plantings using potted material at a spacing of 60 x 60cm (Coimbra and Magnanini ,1953) (all from Francis, undated).
In China, the flowering season from March to October, with fructescence from May to November (CSIS, undated).
Uses
The seeds and other plant parts of M. pudica contain mimosine, and extracts of the plant have been shown in scientific trials to be a moderate diuretic, depress duodenal contractions similar to atropine sulphone, promote regeneration of nerves, and reduce menorrhagia. Antidepressant activity has been demonstrated in humans (Martínez et al.,1996). Root extracts are reported to be a strong emetic (Guzmán, 1975) (all from Francis, undated). M. pudica is used as a part of traditional medicine in SE and S Asia (Biswas and Mukherjee, 2003; Amitendu et al., 2004; Rajan et al., 2002; Ahmad and Holdsworth, 2003). See here for details on the ethnobotanical uses of M. pudica.

M. pudica is also a popular ornamental plant, as its leaves will fold up when stimulated by touch, heat or wind (Whatcom Seed Company, 2006; GRIN, 2006), and is also used for soil improvement (GRIN, 2006).
Habitat Description
Mimosa pudica occurs in croplands, orchards, pastures, mowed areas, roadsides, areas disturbed by construction, moist waste ground, open plantations, and weedy thickets (PIER, 2005; Francis, undated). It may grow as a single plant or in tangled thickets. M. pudica grows from near sea level up to 1,300m in elevation (Holm et al., 1977; in Francis undated) and in areas with annual precipitations from about 1000 to over 2000mm. It is frost-sensitive (Francis, undated).

M. Pudica is shade intolerant and does not compete with tall vegetation or grow under forest canopies. The species’ roots produce carbon disulfide, which selectively inhibits colonization of the rhizosphere by mycorrhizal and pathogenic fungi (Feng et al., 1998; in Francis, undated). M. Pudica is primarily found on soils with low nutrient concentrations, as it is probably outcompeted on richer soils (Magda et al., 2006). It grows on most welldrained soils, even scalped or eroded subsoils. It requires disturbed soils to establish itself. Repeated burning may encourage its spread in pastures (Siregar et al., 1990; in Francis, undated).
Reproduction
In the Philippines, Mimosa pudica flowers all year round, and may produce as many as 675 seeds per plant per year (Holm et al., 1977). The species is both wind (Chieng and Huang, 1998) and bee-pollinated (Payawal et al., 1991). Air-dry seeds from Puerto Rico weighed an average of 0.0065 + 0.0002 g/seed. Seeds are transported by means of the bristles on the edges of their pods that cling to clothing or to the fur of mammals (Francis, undated).

Principal source: Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk. 2005. Mimosa pudica Species Information.
Francis, J.K. Undated. Sensitive plant fact sheet.

Compiler: IUCN SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group
Updates with support from the Overseas Territories Environmental Programme (OTEP) project XOT603, a joint project with the Cayman Islands Government - Department of Environment

Review:

Publication date: 2010-10-04

Recommended citation: Global Invasive Species Database (2017) Species profile: Mimosa pudica. Downloaded from http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/speciesname/Mimosa+pudica on 16-12-2017.

General Impacts
Mimosa pudica forms a dense ground cover, preventing reproduction of other species (PIER, 2005). It has become a serious weed in fields of corn, soybeans, tomatoes, upland rice, cotton, bananas, sugarcane, coffee, oil palms, papayas, coconuts, and rubber in many tropical areas. It is particularly troublesome where hand pulling of weeds is practiced, as its thorns can cause painful wounds. On the other hand, it is tolerated or valued as a forage plant in pastures (Holm et al., 1977, Turbet and Thuraisingham, 1948; in Francis, undated). In fact, sheep grazing is reported to control M. pudica in pastures and plantations (Simonnet, 1990; in Francis,undated). The root nodules have been shown to fix nitrogen (Pokhriyal et al., 1990; in Francis, undated). Thickets of M. pudica may be a fire hazard when dry (PIER, 2005).
Management Info
Preventative measures: A Risk assessment of Mimosa pudica for the Pacific region was prepared by Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER) using the Australian risk assessment system (Pheloung, 1995). The result is a score of 18 and a recommendation of rejection for import into Australia.

A Risk assessment of Mimosa pudica for Florida was prepared by Gordon et al 2008. The result is a score of 17 and a recommendation of rejection for import into Florida.

Physical: Hand weeding is difficult due to the presence of thorns and a woody root (Wagner, 1983; in PIER, 2005). Repeated burning may in fact encourage the spread of M. pudica in pastures (Magda et al., 2006).

Chemical: It is susceptible to several herbicides, including dicamba, glyphosate, picloram and triclopyr (Parsons and Cuthbertson, 1992). Very sensitive to picloram (0.25 lb/acre), sensitive to triclopyr. Dicamba and 2,4-D poor. Soil applied tebuthiuron effective (Motooka et al., 2002) (all from PIER, 2005).

In pasture situations, dicamba and fluroxypyr can be used to control M. pudica. Thorough wetting of all leaf surfaces is essential. If plants are disturbed before spraying, the leaves will fold up and the herbicide will be ineffective. Ensure all spraying is done with forward booms or ahead of operators with knapsack sprayers (Land Protection, 2006).

Biological: See Waterhouse and Norris (1987) and Waterhouse (1994) for information on prospective biological control agents (PIER, 2005).

Coir dust, a waste from coconut processing, can be used as a mulch in pineapple crops to suppress M. pudica and other weeds (Van Mele et al., 1996).

Sheep grazing is reported to control the dominance of M. pudica in pasture (Magda et al., 2006; Francis, undated).

Countries (or multi-country features) with distribution records for Mimosa pudica
Informations on Mimosa pudica has been recorded for the following locations. Click on the name for additional informations.
Lorem Ipsum
Location Status Invasiveness Occurrence Source
Details of Mimosa pudica in information
Status
Invasiveness
Arrival date
Occurrence
Source
Introduction
Species notes for this location
Location note
Management notes for this location
Impact
Mechanism:
Outcome:
Ecosystem services:
Impact information
Mimosa pudica forms a dense ground cover, preventing reproduction of other species (PIER, 2005). It has become a serious weed in fields of corn, soybeans, tomatoes, upland rice, cotton, bananas, sugarcane, coffee, oil palms, papayas, coconuts, and rubber in many tropical areas. It is particularly troublesome where hand pulling of weeds is practiced, as its thorns can cause painful wounds. On the other hand, it is tolerated or valued as a forage plant in pastures (Holm et al., 1977, Turbet and Thuraisingham, 1948; in Francis, undated). In fact, sheep grazing is reported to control M. pudica in pastures and plantations (Simonnet, 1990; in Francis,undated). The root nodules have been shown to fix nitrogen (Pokhriyal et al., 1990; in Francis, undated). Thickets of M. pudica may be a fire hazard when dry (PIER, 2005).
Red List assessed species 0:
Locations
FRENCH GUIANA
Mechanism
[1] Competition
Outcomes
[1] Socio-Economic
  • [1] Damage to agriculture
Management information
Preventative measures: A Risk assessment of Mimosa pudica for the Pacific region was prepared by Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER) using the Australian risk assessment system (Pheloung, 1995). The result is a score of 18 and a recommendation of rejection for import into Australia.

A Risk assessment of Mimosa pudica for Florida was prepared by Gordon et al 2008. The result is a score of 17 and a recommendation of rejection for import into Florida.

Physical: Hand weeding is difficult due to the presence of thorns and a woody root (Wagner, 1983; in PIER, 2005). Repeated burning may in fact encourage the spread of M. pudica in pastures (Magda et al., 2006).

Chemical: It is susceptible to several herbicides, including dicamba, glyphosate, picloram and triclopyr (Parsons and Cuthbertson, 1992). Very sensitive to picloram (0.25 lb/acre), sensitive to triclopyr. Dicamba and 2,4-D poor. Soil applied tebuthiuron effective (Motooka et al., 2002) (all from PIER, 2005).

In pasture situations, dicamba and fluroxypyr can be used to control M. pudica. Thorough wetting of all leaf surfaces is essential. If plants are disturbed before spraying, the leaves will fold up and the herbicide will be ineffective. Ensure all spraying is done with forward booms or ahead of operators with knapsack sprayers (Land Protection, 2006).

Biological: See Waterhouse and Norris (1987) and Waterhouse (1994) for information on prospective biological control agents (PIER, 2005).

Coir dust, a waste from coconut processing, can be used as a mulch in pineapple crops to suppress M. pudica and other weeds (Van Mele et al., 1996).

Sheep grazing is reported to control the dominance of M. pudica in pasture (Magda et al., 2006; Francis, undated).

Management Category
Prevention
Control
None
Bibliography
46 references found for Mimosa pudica

Managment information
IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG)., 2010. A Compilation of Information Sources for Conservation Managers.
Summary: This compilation of information sources can be sorted on keywords for example: Baits & Lures, Non Target Species, Eradication, Monitoring, Risk Assessment, Weeds, Herbicides etc. This compilation is at present in Excel format, this will be web-enabled as a searchable database shortly. This version of the database has been developed by the IUCN SSC ISSG as part of an Overseas Territories Environmental Programme funded project XOT603 in partnership with the Cayman Islands Government - Department of Environment. The compilation is a work under progress, the ISSG will manage, maintain and enhance the database with current and newly published information, reports, journal articles etc.
Land Protection. 2006. Common sensitive plant Mimosa pudica. Facts: Pest series. Natural Resources, Mines and Water, Queensland Government.
Magda, D., Duru, M., Huguenin, J. and Gleizes, B. 2006. Grass and Forage Science. 61: 89-9.
Summary: This paper discusses the invasive impacts of M. pudica in French Guiana.
Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk. 2005. Mimosa pudica Species Information.
Summary: This website provides comprehensive information about weed species in the Pacific, including distribution and management information.
Available from: http://www.hear.org/Pier/species/mimosa_pudica.htm [Accessed 8 May 2006]
Varnham, K. 2006. Non-native species in UK Overseas Territories: a review. JNCC Report 372. Peterborough: United Kingdom.
Summary: This database compiles information on alien species from British Overseas Territories.
Available from: http://www.jncc.gov.uk/page-3660 [Accessed 10 November 2009]
Waterhouse, D. F. 1994. Biological control of weeds: Southeast Asian prospects. Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research, Canberra. p. 158-162.
Summary: This article discusses the potential for biological control of weed species.
Waterhouse, D. F. and K. R. Norris. 1987. Biological control: Pacific prospects. Inkata Press, Melbourne. p. 328-331.
Summary: This article discusses the potential for biological control of weed species in the Pacific.
General information
Abraham, M. and Abraham, C.T. 2000. Weed flora of rubber plantations in Kerala. Indian Journal of Natural Rubber Research. 13 (1-2): 86-91.
Summary: This paper describes the weed plants of rubber plantations in Kerala, India.
Ahmad, F.B. and Holdsworth, D.K. 2003. Medicinal plants of Sabah, East Malaysia - Part 1. Pharmaceutical Biology. 41 (5): 340-346.
Summary: This paper examines the use of plants in traditional medicine in Sabah, East Malaysia.
Alam, M.K. and Yusof, M. 1992. The genus Mimosa Linn. from Bangladesh. Bangladesh Journal of Botany. 21 (1): 53-58.
Summary: This paper provides details about species of the genus Mimosa in Bangladesh.
Baessler, M. 1985. The genus Mimosa Leguminosae Mimosoideae in Cuba. Feddes Repertorium. 96 (7-10): 581-611.
Summary: This paper describes the species of genus Mimosa which are present in Cuba.
Bambaradeniya, C.N.B., Edirisinghe, J.P., De Silva, D.N., Gunatilleke, C.V.S., Ranawana, K.B. and Wijekoon, S. 2004. Biodiversity associated with an irrigated rice agro-ecosystem in Sri Lanka. Biodiversity and Conservation. 13: 1715-1753.
Summary: This paper discusses the biodiversity which can be found in a rice field ecosystem in Sri Lanka.
Bambaradeniya, C.N.B., Ekanayake, S.P., Kekulandala, L.D.C.B., Samarawickrama, V.A.P., Ratnayake, N.D. and Fernando, R.H.S.S. 2002. An Assessment of the Status of Biodiversity in the Muthurajawela Wetland Sanctuary. Occasional Papers of IUCN Sri Lanka No. 3:iv-48pp.
Summary: This paper provides an assessment of the biodiversity of the Muthurajawela Wetland Sanctuary in Sri Lanka.
Barthelat, F. 2005. Note sur les esp�ces exotiques envahissantes � Mayotte. Direction de l�Agriculture et de la For�t. 30p
Summary: Tableau synth�tique des plantes exotiques de Mayotte class�es en fonction de leur niveau d envahissement.
Biswas, T.K. and Mukherjee, B. 2003. Plant medicines of Indian origin for wound healing activity: a review. Lower Extremity Wounds. 2 (1): 25-39.
Summary: This paper provides details about the use of plants in Ayurvedic medicine.
Blanfort, pers. comm., 2007
Summary: Personal communication with Vincent Blanfort, a weed scientist of CIRAD.
Bridgewater, S., Ibanez, A., Ratter, J.A. and Furley, P. 2002. Vegetation classification and floristics of the savannas and associated wetlands of the Rio Bravo Conservation and Management Area, Belize. Edinburgh Journal of Botany. 59 (3): 421-442.
Summary: This paper gives details about the vegetation composition in the Rio Bravo Conservation and Management Area in Belize.
Centre des ressources biologiques. Plantes tropicales. INRA-CIRAD. 2007.
Summary: Available from: http://collections.antilles.inra.fr/ [Accessed 31 March 2008]
Chinese Species Information Service. Undated.
Summary: This website provides detailed information about invasive species in China.
Available from: http://www.chinabiodiversity.com/search/aspecies/english/econ.shtm [Accessed 9 May 2006]
Conservatoire Botanique National De Mascarin (BOULLET V. coord.) 2007. Mimosa pudica.- Index de la flore vasculaire de la R�union (Trach�ophytes) : statuts, menaces et protections. - Version 2007.1
Summary: Base de donn�es sur la flore de la R�union. De nombreuses informations tr�s utiles.
Available from:http://flore.cbnm.org/index2.php?page=taxon&num=f08b7ac8aa30a2a9ab34394e200e1a71 [Accessed March 2008]
Florence J., Chevillotte H., Ollier C. & Meyer J.-Y. 2007.Mimosa pudica. Base de donn�es botaniques Nadeaud de l Herbier de la Polyn�sie fran�aise (PAP).
Summary: Available from:http://www.herbier-tahiti.pf/Selection_Taxonomie.php?id_tax=2517 [Accessed March 2008]
Fournet, J. 2002. Flore illustr�e des phan�rogames de guadeloupe et de Martinique. CIRAD-Gondwana editions.
Francis, J.K. Undated. Sensitive plant fact sheet.
Summary: This fact sheet provides information about the biology of M. pudica.
Available from: http://www.fs.fed.us/global/iitf/pdf/shrubs/Mimosa%20pudica.pdf#xml=http://www.fs.fed.us/cgi-bin/texis/searchallsites/search.allsites/xml.txt?query=fabaceae&db=allsites&id=424cbeea0 [Accessed 9 May 2006]
Ghazanfar, S.A., Keppel, G. and Khan, S. 2001. Coastal vegetation of small islands near Viti Levu and Ovalau, Fiji. New Zealand Journal of Botany. 39: 587-600.
Summary: This paper provides details on the vegetation of the small islands near Viti Levu and Ovalau in Fiji.
Hingston, A.B., Marsden-Smedley, J., Driscoll, D.A., Corbett, S., Fenton, J., Anderson, R., Plowman, C., Mowling, F., Jenkin, M., Matsui, K., Bonham, K.J., Ilowski, M., McQuillan, P.B., Yaxley, B., Reid, T., Storey, D., Poole, L., Mallick, S.A., Fitzgerald, N., Kirkpatrick, J.B., Febey, J., Harwood, A.G., Michaels, K.F., Russell, M.J., Black, P.G., Emmerson, L., Visoiu, M., Morgan, J., Breen, S., Gates, S., Bantich, M.N. and Desmarchelier, J.M. 2002. Extent of invasion of Tasmanian native vegetation by the exotic bumblebee Bombus terrestris (Apoidea: Apidae). Austral Ecology. 27 (2): 162.
Summary: This paper examines the impacts of the introduced bumblebee on native vegetation in Tasmania, Australia.
Karanth, K.K., Curran, L.M. and Reuning-Scherer, J.D. 2006. Village size and forest disturbance in Bhadra Wildlife Sanctuary, Western Ghats, India. Biological Conservation. 128 (2): 147-157.
Summary: This paper discusses the state of the Bhadra Wildlife Sanctuary in India.
Lisowski, S. 1996. The Mimosaceae in the flora of Guinea (western Africa). Fragmenta Floristica et Geobotanica. 41 (1): 339-354.
Summary: This paper outlines the species of Mimosaceae present in Guinea, western Africa.
Mack, R.N. and Erneberg, M. 2002. The United States naturalized flora: largely the product of deliberate introductions. Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden. 89 (2): 176-189.
Summary: This paper discusses the deliberate plant introductions to the USA over the past two centuries.
Meyer, J.-Y. pers. comm., 2007
Summary: Personal communication with Jean Yves Meyer, from the D�l�gation � la Recherche of French Polynesia
Multilingual Multiscript Plant Name Database. 2005. Sorting Mimosa names.
Summary: This website provides a list of common names which are used for M. pudica in a variety of languages.
Available from: http://www.plantnames.unimelb.edu.au/Sorting/Mimosa.html [Accessed 17 May 2006]
Nayagam, M.C. and Pushparaj, M.S. 1999. Touch me not : A medicinal plant of the Nilgiri tribals: A study. Journal of Economic and Taxonomic Botany. 23 (2): 417-420.
Summary: This paper details the use of M. pudica as a medicinal plant in Tamil Nadu, India.
Okezie Akobundu, I. and Ekeleme, F. 2002. Weed seedbank characteristics of arable fields under different fallow management systems in the humid tropical zone of southeastern Nigeria. Agroforestry Systems. 54 (1): 161-170.
Summary: This paper discusses the management of weeds in arable landscapes in southeastern Nigeria.
Rajan, S., Sethuraman, M. and Mukherjee, P.K. 2002. Ethnobiology of the Nilgiri Hills, India. Phytotherapy Research. 16: 98-116.
Summary: This article discusses the use of traditional medicine by the people of the Nilgiri Hills, India.
Siddique, N.A., Bari, M.A., Naderuzzaman, A.T.M., Khatun, N., Rahman, M.H., Sultana, R.S., Matin, M.N., Shahnewaz, S. and Rahman, M.M. 2004. Collection of indigenous knowledge and identification of endangered medicinal plants by questionnaire survey in Barind tract of Bangladesh. Journal of Biological Sciences. 4 (1): 72-80.
Summary: This paper discusses the use of plants in traditional medicine in Bangladesh.
Space, J.C. and Flynn, T. 2001. Report to the Kingdom of Tonga on Invasive Plant Species of Environmental Concern.
Summary: Available from: http://www.hear.org/pier/pdf/tonga_report.pdf [Accessed 29 March 2006]
Space, J.C. and Flynn, T. 2002. Report to the government of the Cook Islands on invasive plant species of environmental concern. USDA Forest Service.
Summary: This report provides details about the invasive plant species of the Cook Islands.
Space, J.C., Waterhouse, B.M., Miles, J.E., Tiobech, J. and Rengulbai, K. 2003. Report to the Republic of Palau on invasive plant species of environmental concern. USDA Forest Service.
Summary: This paper presents an analysis of the invasive plant species which are present in Palau.
Available from: http://www.hear.org/pier/pdf/palau_report.pdf [Accessed 15 May 2006]
Triet, T. Undated. Alien invasive plants of the Mekong Delta: an overview. Vietnam National University. Alien Invasive Species. Report of workshop on Alien Invasive Species, GBF - SSEA.
Summary: This paper outlines the invasive plant species of the Mekong Delta in Vietnam.
Available from: http://www.biodiversityasia.org/books/alien/Chapter%209.pdf [Accessed 15 May 2006]
Turner, C., Tamblyn, A., Dray, R., Maunder, L. and Raines, P. 2003. The biodiversity of the Upper Imbang-Caliban Watershed, North Negros Forest Reserve, Negros Occidental, Philippines. Technical publication of the Negros Rainforest Conservation Project: A collaborative initiative between the Negros Forests and Ecological Foundation, Inc. and Coral Cay Conservation.
Summary: This paper outlines the biodiversity which can be found in the Upper Imbang-Caliban watershed of the North Negros Forest Reserve in the Philippines.
Available from: http://www.coralcay.org/science/publications/philippines_t_2003_bio_caliban.pdf [Accessed 15 May 2006]
USDA-ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Germplasm Resources Information Network - (GRIN) [Online Database]. National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland.
Summary: This database provides basic information on M. pudica.
Available from: http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?24405 [Accessed 16 May 2006]
USDA PLANTS profile. Mimosa pudica.
Summary: This database provides basic information on M. pudica distribution in the USA.
Available from: http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=MIPU8 [Accessed 16 May 2006]
Whatcom Seed Company. 2006.
Summary: This website provides a list of garden plants which can be purchased over the internet.
Wu, S-H., Chaw, S-M. and Rejmanek, M. 2003. Naturalized Fabaceae (Leguminosae) species in Taiwan: the first approximation. Botanical Bulletin of Academia Sinica. 44: 59-66.
Summary: This paper provides details on the naturalized members of Fabaceae in Taiwan, including M. pudica.
WWF. 2006. National list of naturalised invasive and potentially invasive garden plants.
Summary: This document was produced by WWF Australia, and provides information about invasive and potentially invasive garden plants in Australia.
Available from: http://wwf.org.au/publications/ListInvasivePlants.pdf [Accessed 9 May 2006]
Contact
The following 0 contacts offer information an advice on Mimosa pudica