Global invasive species database

  • General
  • Distribution
  • Impact
  • Management
  • Bibliography
  • Contact
prev
  • Chinaberry tree bark in autumn (Photo: James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, www.forestryimages.org)
  • Chinaberry tree bark in summer (Photo: James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, www.forestryimages.org)
  • Flowers in spring with mature fruit from previous season (Photo: Ted Bodner, Southern Weed Science Society, www.forestryimages.org)
  • Bipinnately compound leaves in summer (Photo: James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, www.forestryimages.org)
  • Foliage (Photo: Cheryl McCormick, The University of Georgia, www.forestryimages.org)
  • Immature fruit in summer (Photo: James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, www.forestryimages.org)
  • Mature seeds within the crown in winter (Photo: James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, www.forestryimages.org)
  • Rootsprouts in summer (Photo: James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, www.forestryimages.org)
  • Chinaberry tree (Photo: Chuck Bargeron, The University of Georgia, www.forestryimages.org)
  • Chinaberry tree in autumn (Photo: James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, www.forestryimages.org)
  • Chinaberry tree in summer (Photo: James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, www.forestryimages.org)
next
Common name
persischer Flieder (German), Persian lilac (English), chuan liang zi (Chinese), indischer Zedrachbaum (German), lilas des Indes (French), syringa berrytree (English), Sichuan pagoda-tree (English), arbre à chapelets (French), umbrella tree (English), amargoseira-do-Himalaio (Portuguese), sendan (Japanese), pride-of-India (English), white cedar (English), Indian lilac (English), jazmin (Spanish), margosa tree (English), bakain (English, Fiji), tira (English, Cook Islands), 'inia (English), para'isu (English, Guam), paraíso (Spanish), dake (English), sili (English), sita (English, Tonga), tili (English, Niue), lelah (English, Pohnpei), melia (Spanish), prais (English, Yap), alelaila (English, Puerto Rico), chinaberry (English), 'ilinia (English, Hawaii)
Synonym
Melia japonica , var. semperflorens Makino
Melia azedarach , var. japonica (G. Don) Makino
Melia toosendan , Siebold & Zucc.
Melia australis , Sweet
Melia sempervirens , Sw.
Azedarach amena , Raf.
Azedarach deleteria , Medik.
Azedarach sempervirens , Kuntze forma incisodentata Kuntze
Azedarach sempervirens , Kuntze forma subdentata Kuntze
Azedarach sempervirens , Kuntze forma longifoliola Kuntze
Azedarach sempervirens , Kuntze
Azedarach sempervirens , Kuntze var. glabrior Kuntze
Azedarach sempervirens , Kuntze var. dubia (Cav. ex M.Roem.) Kuntze
Azedarach sempervirens , Kuntze forma typica Kuntze
Azedarach sempervirens , Kuntze var. australasica (Juss.) Kuntze
Azedarach sempervirens , Kuntze forma squamulosa (C.DC.) Kuntze
Azedarach sempervirens , Kuntze forma arguta (DC.) Kuntze
Azedarach sempervirens , Kuntze forma sambucina (Blume) Kuntze
Azedarach speciosa , Raf.
Melia angustifolia , Schumach.
Melia arguta , DC.
Melia australasica , Juss.
Melia azedarach , L. var. sempervirens L.
Melia azedarach , L. var. subtripinnata Miq.
Melia azedarach , L. var. glabrior C.DC.
Melia azedarach , L. forma umbraculifera (G.Knox) Rehder
Melia azedarach , L. var. umbraculiformis Berckmans & L.H.Bailey
Melia azedarach , L. subvar. intermedia Makino
Melia azedarach , L. var. squamulosa C.DC.
Melia azedarach , L. var. incisa Miq.
Melia azedarach , L. var. umbraculifera G.Knox
Melia azedarach , L. var. japonica (G.Don) Makino
Melia azedarach , L. var. cochinchinensis (Pierre) Pellegr.
Melia azedarach , L. var. sambucina (Blume) Miq.
Melia azedarach , L. var. australasica (Juss.) C.DC.
Melia azedarach , L. var. javanica Koord. & Valeton
Melia azedarach , L. forma albiflora Makino
Melia azedarach , L. var. glandulosa Pierre
Melia azedarach , L. var. biglandulosa Pierre ex Pellegr.
Melia azedarach , L. var. intermedia (Makino) Makino
Melia azedarach , L. subvar. semperflorens (Makino) Makino
Melia azedarach , L. var. acuminatissima Miq.
Melia azedarach , L. var. floribunda (Carri�re) Morren
Melia birmanica , Kurz
Melia bogoriensis , Koord. & Valeton
Melia candollei , Juss.
Melia cochinchinensis , M.Roem.
Melia commelinii , Medik.
Melia composita , Willd.
Melia composita , Willd. var. cochinchinensis Pierre
Melia dubia , Cav. ex M.Roem.
Melia azedarach , L. var. umbraculifera Knox
Azedarach vulgaris , M.Gómez
Melia floribunda , Carri�re
Melia florida , Salisb.
Melia guineensis , G.Don
Melia hasskarlii , K.Koch
Melia japonica , G.Don var. squamulosa C.DC.
Melia japonica , G.Don var. semperflorens Makino
Melia japonica , G.Don
Melia japonica , Hassk.
Melia javanica , M.Roem.
Melia orientalis ,M.Roem.
Melia robusta , Roxb. ex G.Don
Melia sambucina , Blume
Melia superba , Roxb.
Antelaea javanica , Gaertn.
Similar species
Meliaceae
Summary
Melia azedarach is a tree of the mahogany family that is native to Australasia and often planted as an ornamental shade tree. It invades along roadways, fencerows and other disturbed areas. Melia azedarach has also been found in upland grasslands, woodlands, pastures and riparian areas. Melia azedarach requires open sun, but adapts to a wide range of soil moisture conditions. It grows between sea level and 700 metres in open dry habitats and is highly resistant to insects and other pathogens. It produces much fruit, which is consumed by birds that disperse the seeds. Melia azedarach also reproduces vegetatively by forming root suckers, which allows it to spread and form dense, thickets.
Species Description
M. azedarach is described as a small to medium-sized shrub or tree in the mahogany family (Meliaceae). Branches are stout, with purplish bark dotted with buff-coloured lenticels. Leaves are twice to three-times compound, alternate, and puberulent to glabrous. Leaflets are 2-8cm long, serrate or crenate, dark green above, often with sparse hairs along the veins, and lighter green and generally smooth below. The inflorescence is a panicle from leaf axils and from leafless nodes on the lower part of the new growth. The perfect flowers are 5-parted. Sepals are green, 1.5-2mm long. Petals are pinkish lavender, ligulate, 1-1.3cm long. Stamens are united into a cylindrical, dark purple tube, 6-8mm long, and cut at the apex into 15-25 slender teeth. Each flower has ten anthers. Flowers are fragrant. (Batcher, 2000) states that the fruit is a stalked, one-seeded drupe that is greenish yellow to yellowish tan, globose, and 1-1.5cm in diameter (Burks 1997).
Notes
Batcher (2000) states that the fruits are poisonous to humans and to some other mammals. M. azedarach has a shallow root system, generally within the top 70cm of the soil, and allocates most of its photosynthate into aboveground shoots (Toky and Bisht 1993, in Batcher 2000).
Lifecycle Stages
Batcher (2000) notes that M. azedarach seeds are highly tolerant to desiccation, surviving to 3.5% moisture content. The seeds can remain viable for prolonged periods--up to at least 26 months (Hong and Ellis 1998, in Batcher 2000).
Uses
Batcher (2000) notes that M. azedarach is often planted as an ornamental shade tree. It has also been used as an abortifacient, an antiseptic, a purgative, a diuretic, an insect repellent, etc. (HerbWeb 2000, in Batcher, 2000).
Habitat Description
Batcher (2000) states that M. azedarach invades along road rights of way, fencerows, and other disturbed areas. It has also been found in upland grasslands, woodlands, and riparian areas in the southeastern U.S. (Randall and Rice, unpublished, in Batcher 2000) and in southwestern Africa (Everett et al. 1989, Henderson and Musil 1984, in Batcher, 2000). PIER (2003) states that it grows between sea level and 700m in open dry habitats. It favours old fields, abandoned lots, roadsides, and other disturbed areas (C.W. Smith 1985, in PIER 2003). M. Azedarach has begun to invade relatively undisturbed floodplain hammocks, marshes, and upland woods in Florida (Langeland and Burks 1998). In Texas, riparian woodlands and upland grasslands have also been extensively invaded (Randall and Rice, unpublished, in Batcher 2000). In Hawai‘i, it is naturalized in dry, disturbed areas, especially gulches and pastures to 610m elevation (Wagner et al. 1999). In Fiji, it is cultivated or sparingly naturalized at low elevations (Smith 1985, in PIER 2003). Batcher (2000) states that based on general descriptions of habitat, it is likely that M. Azedarach requires open sun, is not shade tolerant, and is adapted to a wide range of soil moisture conditions. It is highly tolerant of heat and drought (Time Life Plant Encyclopedia Virtual Garden 1999, in Batcher 2000).
Reproduction
Batcher (2000) states that M. azedarach has a high degree of reproductive vigor. It flowers and fruits when it reaches the size of a shrub. Fruits are long maturing, large in number, and persist past leaf fall. It is a prolific seed producer, and birds readily disperse them. It also reproduces vegetatively by forming root suckers. Batcher (2000) states M. azedarach can reach 6-8 metres in height within four or five years. Maximum height can be 12-16 metres.
Nutrition
Melia azedarach is highly tolerant of poor soil conditions (Time Life Plant Encyclopedia Virtual Garden 1999, in Batcher 2000).
Pathway
As noted earlier, this species has been introduced in new ranges as an ornamental shade tree. In North America it was introduced around 1830 as an ornamental in South Carolina and Georgia (Gordon and Thomas 1997, in Langeland and Burks 1998).Batcher (2000) states that in the New World it is commonly cultivated as a shade or reforestation tree.

Principal source: Batcher, 2000. Element Stewardship Abstract for Melia azedarach
Langeland, K.A. and Burks, K. C (Eds) 1998. Identification and Biology of Non-Native Plants in Florida's Natural Areas, University of Florida. Melia azedarach
PIER (Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk) 2003. Melia azedarach.

Compiler: National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) & IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG)

Review: K. C. Burks, Florida Natural Areas Inventory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA

Publication date: 2006-03-23

Recommended citation: Global Invasive Species Database (2016) Species profile: Melia azedarach. Downloaded from http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=636 on 29-09-2016.

General Impacts
Batcher (2000) states that M. azedarach can invade disturbed and relatively undisturbed areas, and by doing so, it can decrease native biodiversity. It has numerous defenses against insects and other plant pathogens, giving it a competitive advantage over many native species (Nardo et al. 1997, Neupane 1992, Vallardes et al. 1997, in Batcher 2000). Its leaf litter can increase the pH of soils and add nitrogen, significantly altering soil chemistry (Noble et al. 1996, in Batcher 2000). Leaf litter of M. azedarach was also effective in reducing aluminum levels in soil (Noble et al. 1996, in Batcher 2000). Decaying leaf litter can enhance the soil concentration of mineralizable nitrogen by an amount comparable to nitrogen-fixing legumes (Singh et al. 1996, in Batcher 2000). This invasive plant can also successfully reproduce vegetatively, forming dense thickets (Langeland and Burks 1998). These characteristics have contributed to its establishment throughout much of the southeastern United States, where it negatively affects native populations of plants and animals.
Management Info
Preventative measures: A Risk Assessment of Melia azedarach for Hawai‘i and other Pacific islands was prepared by Dr. Curtis Daehler (UH Botany) with funding from the Kaulunani Urban Forestry Program and US Forest Service. The alien plant screening system is derived from Pheloung et al. (1999) with minor modifications for use in Pacific islands (Daehler et al. 2004). The result is a score of 14 and a recommendation of: \"Likely to cause significant ecological or economic harm in Hawai‘i and on other Pacific Islands as determined by a high WRA score, which is based on published sources describing species biology and behaviour in Hawai‘i and/or other parts of the world.\"

If M. azedarach is controlled during the early stages of establishment, the potential for successful management is high. The potential for large-scale restoration of wildlands where it has already become established, however, is probably lower due to requirements for longer-term efforts. The best control of M. azedarach, as reported by land stewards/managers, occurs with the appropriate use of chemical methods.

Chemical: In an article describing herbicide control measures for many of the invasive exotic species in Florida, Kline and Duquesnel (1996) recommend the following methods, herbicides and equipment, for the chemical control of M. azedarach. For basal bark treatments (which can be applied to a range of stem sizes, from saplings to large trees) the use of 10% Garlon 4 is recommended. A back-pack sprayer, spray gun or a hand-held spray bottle can be used for application. For cut-surface treatment (which could be tree-injection, girdle (frill) method or a cut stump treatment) the use of 50% Garlon 3A is recommended. Back-pack sprayers or pump-up sprayers are suitable for cut-surface treatments. For foliar spray 1% (high volume) Garlon 3A is recommended. The authors report that the effectivness of the basal bark and cut-surface treatments are 'excellent' and that of the foliar spray is 'good'.

Mechanical: The authors of a study into the clonal strategies of M. azedarach state that injury to the plant, by animal-mediated injury at a local scale or by fire on a large scale induced prolific resprouting - thus increasing the density and spread of the species. The authors demonstrate that excised roots initiate the development of adventitious buds and suckers (Tourn et al. 1999).

Countries (or multi-country features) with distribution records for Melia azedarach
Informations on Melia azedarach has been recorded for the following locations. Click on the name for additional informations.
Lorem Ipsum
Location Status Invasiveness Occurrence Source
Details of Melia azedarach in information
Status
Invasiveness
Arrival date
Occurrence
Source
Introduction
Species notes for this location
Location note
Management notes for this location
Impact
Mechanism:
Outcome:
Ecosystem services:
Impact information
Batcher (2000) states that M. azedarach can invade disturbed and relatively undisturbed areas, and by doing so, it can decrease native biodiversity. It has numerous defenses against insects and other plant pathogens, giving it a competitive advantage over many native species (Nardo et al. 1997, Neupane 1992, Vallardes et al. 1997, in Batcher 2000). Its leaf litter can increase the pH of soils and add nitrogen, significantly altering soil chemistry (Noble et al. 1996, in Batcher 2000). Leaf litter of M. azedarach was also effective in reducing aluminum levels in soil (Noble et al. 1996, in Batcher 2000). Decaying leaf litter can enhance the soil concentration of mineralizable nitrogen by an amount comparable to nitrogen-fixing legumes (Singh et al. 1996, in Batcher 2000). This invasive plant can also successfully reproduce vegetatively, forming dense thickets (Langeland and Burks 1998). These characteristics have contributed to its establishment throughout much of the southeastern United States, where it negatively affects native populations of plants and animals.
Red List assessed species 0:
Locations
SOUTH AFRICA
Mechanism
[1] Competition
Outcomes
[3] Environmental Ecosystem - Habitat
  • [1] Modification of nutrient pool and fluxes
  • [1] Modification of food web
  • [1] Reduction in native biodiversity
Management information
Preventative measures: A Risk Assessment of Melia azedarach for Hawai‘i and other Pacific islands was prepared by Dr. Curtis Daehler (UH Botany) with funding from the Kaulunani Urban Forestry Program and US Forest Service. The alien plant screening system is derived from Pheloung et al. (1999) with minor modifications for use in Pacific islands (Daehler et al. 2004). The result is a score of 14 and a recommendation of: \"Likely to cause significant ecological or economic harm in Hawai‘i and on other Pacific Islands as determined by a high WRA score, which is based on published sources describing species biology and behaviour in Hawai‘i and/or other parts of the world.\"

If M. azedarach is controlled during the early stages of establishment, the potential for successful management is high. The potential for large-scale restoration of wildlands where it has already become established, however, is probably lower due to requirements for longer-term efforts. The best control of M. azedarach, as reported by land stewards/managers, occurs with the appropriate use of chemical methods.

Chemical: In an article describing herbicide control measures for many of the invasive exotic species in Florida, Kline and Duquesnel (1996) recommend the following methods, herbicides and equipment, for the chemical control of M. azedarach. For basal bark treatments (which can be applied to a range of stem sizes, from saplings to large trees) the use of 10% Garlon 4 is recommended. A back-pack sprayer, spray gun or a hand-held spray bottle can be used for application. For cut-surface treatment (which could be tree-injection, girdle (frill) method or a cut stump treatment) the use of 50% Garlon 3A is recommended. Back-pack sprayers or pump-up sprayers are suitable for cut-surface treatments. For foliar spray 1% (high volume) Garlon 3A is recommended. The authors report that the effectivness of the basal bark and cut-surface treatments are 'excellent' and that of the foliar spray is 'good'.

Mechanical: The authors of a study into the clonal strategies of M. azedarach state that injury to the plant, by animal-mediated injury at a local scale or by fire on a large scale induced prolific resprouting - thus increasing the density and spread of the species. The authors demonstrate that excised roots initiate the development of adventitious buds and suckers (Tourn et al. 1999).

Locations
BOLIVIA
SOUTH AFRICA
Management Category
Prevention
Control
Bibliography
26 references found for Melia azedarach

Managment information
Batcher M.S. 2000. Element Stewardship Abstract for Melia azedarach. The Nature Conservancy.
Summary: An Element Stewardship Abstract containing detail report on description, distribution, dispersal methods, impacts, habitats and control.
Available from: http://www.invasive.org/gist/esadocs/documnts/meliaze.pdf [Accessed 19 July 2010]
Daehler, C.C; Denslow, J.S; Ansari, S and Huang-Chi, K., 2004. A Risk-Assessment System for Screening Out Invasive Pest Plants from Hawaii and Other Pacific Islands. Conservation Biology Volume 18 Issue 2 Page 360.
Summary: A study on the use of a screening system to assess proposed plant introductions to Hawaii or other Pacific Islands and to identify high-risk species used in horticulture and forestry which would greatly reduce future pest-plant problems and allow entry of most nonpests.
Foxcroft, Llewellyn, C & David, M.R., 2003. Managing alien plant invasions in Kruger national Park, South Africa. In Plant Invasions: Ecological threats and Management Solutions, pp 385-403 Eds L.E. Child; J.H. Brock; G. Brundu; K. Prach; P. Pysek; P.M. Wade; and M. Williamson. Blackhuys Publishers, Netherlands.
Ghersa, Claudio M; de la Fuente, Elba; Suarez, Susana; and Leon, Rolando J. C., 2002. Woody species invasion in the Rolling Pampa grasslands, Argentina Agriculture Ecosystems & Environment. 88(3). 271-278.
Kline, W.N and Duquesnel, J.G., 1996. Management of invasive exotic plants with herbicides in Florida. DowElanco, Vol 51 (2)
PIER (Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk) 2003. Melia azedarach
Summary: Short report on description, habitat, dispersal methods and control.
Available from: http://www.hear.org/pier/species/melia_azedarach.htm [Accessed 5 June 2003]
Swaziland s Alien Plants Database., Undated. Melia azedarach
Summary: A database of Swaziland s alien plant species.
Tourn, G.M; Menvielle, M.F; Scopel, A.L. & Pidal, B., 1999. Clonal strategies of a woody weed: Melia azedarach. Plant and Soil 217: 111�117,
Van Wilgen, B.W; Richardson D.M; Le Maitre D.C; Marais C, & Magadlela D., 2001. The economic consequences of alien plant invasions: examples of impacts and approaches to sustainable management in South Africa. Environment, Development and Sustainability 3: 145�168.
Varnham, K. 2006. Non-native species in UK Overseas Territories: a review. JNCC Report 372. Peterborough: United Kingdom.
Summary: This database compiles information on alien species from British Overseas Territories.
Available from: http://www.jncc.gov.uk/page-3660 [Accessed 10 November 2009]
General information
Barthelat, F. 2005. Note sur les esp�ces exotiques envahissantes � Mayotte. Direction de l�Agriculture et de la For�t. 30p
Summary: Tableau synth�tique des plantes exotiques de Mayotte class�es en fonction de leur niveau d envahissement.
Centre des ressources biologiques. Plantes tropicales. INRA-CIRAD. 2007.
Summary: Available from: http://collections.antilles.inra.fr/ [Accessed 31 March 2008]
Conservatoire Botanique National De Mascarin (BOULLET V. coord.) 2007. - Melia azedarach Index de la flore vasculaire de la R�union (Trach�ophytes) : statuts, menaces et protections. - Version 2007.1
Summary: Base de donn�es sur la flore de La R�union. De nombreuses informations tr�s utiles.
Available from: http://flore.cbnm.org/index2.php?page=taxon&num=9713faa264b94e2bf346a1bb52587fd8 [Accessed 9 April 2008]
Florence J., Chevillotte H., Ollier C. & Meyer J.-Y. 2007. Melia azedarach Base de donn�es botaniques Nadeaud de l Herbier de la Polyn�sie fran�aise (PAP).
Summary: Available from: http://www.herbier-tahiti.pf/Selection_Taxonomie.php?id_tax=2407 [Accessed 9 April 2008]
Fournet, J. 2002. Flore illustr�e des phan�rogames de guadeloupe et de Martinique. CIRAD-Gondwana editions.
Francis, J.K and A. H. Liogier, 1991. Naturalized exotic tree species in Puerto Rico. Gen. Tech. Rep. SO-82. New Orleans, LA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station. 12 p.
Hammer, K; Laghetti, G & Perrino, H., 1999. A checklist of the cultivated plants of Ustica (Italy) Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution 46: 95�106
ITIS (Integrated Taxonomic Information System), 2005. Online Database Melia azedarach
Summary: An online database that provides taxonomic information, common names, synonyms and geographical jurisdiction of a species. In addition links are provided to retrieve biological records and collection information from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) Data Portal and bioscience articles from BioOne journals.
Available from: http://www.cbif.gc.ca/pls/itisca/taxastep?king=every&p_action=containing&taxa=Melia+azedarach&p_format=&p_ifx=plglt&p_lang= [Accessed March 2005]
Langeland, K.A. and Burks, K. C (Eds) 1998. Identification and Biology of Non-Native Plants in Florida s Natural Areas, University of Florida. Melia azedarach.
Summary: Information on plants that pose threats to natural resource areas in Florida.
Available from: http://www.fleppc.org/ID_book/melia%20azederach.pdf [Accessed 10 June 2003]
Rocha Estrada, Alejandra ; Torres Cepeda, Teresa E.; Del Consuelo Gonzalez De La Rosa, M.; Martinez Lozano, Salomon J; Avarado Vazquez, Marco A., 1998. Ornamental flora of public plazas and gardens of the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Mexico. Sida Contributions to Botany. 18(2). Dec., 579-586.
Tickner, D. P; Angold, P.G; Gurnell, A & Mountford, J. O., 2001. Riparian plant invasions: hydrogeomorphological control and ecological impacts. Progress in Physical Geography 25,1 pp. 22�52
USDA-ARS (United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service) National Genetic Resources Program. Germplasm Resources Information Network - (GRIN). [Online Database] National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland.
Summary: Information on common names, synonyms, distributional range of species.
Available from: http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?23936 [Accessed 22 May 2003]
USDA-NRCS (United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service). 2002. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.5. Baton Rouge, Louisiana: National Plant Data Center.
Summary: Brief report on distribution, taxonomy and links to information about the invasive.
Available from http://plants.usda.gov/cgi_bin/topics.cgi [Accessed 22 May 2003]
USF-AFVP (University of South Florida - Atlas of Florida Vascular Plants) 2003. Institute for Systematic Botany: Melia azedarach.
Summary: Short list of common names and synonyms.
Available from: http://www.plantatlas.usf.edu/main.asp?plantID=1691 [Accessed 29 May 2003].
Yung Jim C., 1998. Impacts of intensive urbanization on trees in Hong Kong. Environmental Conservation 25 (2): 146�159
Zalba, S. M & Villamil, C.B, 2002. Woody plant invasion in relictual grasslands. Biological Invasions 4: 55�72,
Summary: A study on the invasion of woody aliens in the Argentine Pampas.
Contact
The following 4 contacts offer information an advice on Melia azedarach
Barthelat,
Fabien
Organization:
Assistant Technique Union Internationale pour la Conservation de la Nature Initiative Cara�bes
Address:
C/O Parc National de Guadeloupe Habitation Beausoleil, Mont�ran 97120 Saint-Claude, Guadeloupe
Phone:
(+590) (0)590 80 86 00
Fax:
(+590) (0)590 80 05 46
Burks,
Dr. K. C.
Organization:
Botanist, Florida Natural Areas Inventory (FSU)
Address:
1018 Thomasville Rd., Suite 200-C Tallahassee, FL 32303
Phone:
850-224-8207, ext. 210
Fax:
850-681-9364
Lavergne,
Christophe
Geographic region: Indian Ocean
Ecosystem: Terrestrial
Organization:
Conservatoire Botanique National de Mascarin
Address:
2 rue du P�re Georges Domaine des Colima�ons 97436 SAINT LEU
Phone:
(33) 02 62 24 92 27
Fax:
Meyer,
Jean-Yves
Geographic region: Pacific, Indian Ocean
Ecosystem: Terrestrial
Expert in the botany of French Polynesia and the Pacific Islands, and has worked on ecology and biological control of Miconia calvescens in French Polynesia.
Organization:
D�l�gation � la Recherche
Address:
D�l�gation � la Recherche, Gouvernement de Polyn�sie fran�aise. B.P. 20981, 98713 Papeete, Tahiti, Polyn�sie fran�aise
Phone:
689 47 25 60
Fax: