Global invasive species database

  • General
  • Distribution
  • Impact
  • Management
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Common name
Synonym
Rubus capricorni
Rubus hillii
Rubus moluccanus , var. dendrocharis
Similar species
Summary
Rubus moluccanus is a member of the raspberry and blackberry family and has a wide distribution throughout South-East Asia and the Pacific. Its berries, fruit and leaves are able to be used for a variety of culinary purposes and medicinal purposes. It can spread via runners that sprout when they touch the ground and its seeds are dispersed by birds. This scrambling shrub or climber reaches 2 to 3m high and threatens native plants through overcrowding and competition and its prickly stems may pose a hazard to humans and livestock.
Species Description
Rubus moluccanus is a scrambling shrub or climber reaching 2 to 3m high. The stems and leaves are armed with medium sized spines (PIER, 2002). The leaves are large and lobed, glabrous or sparsely hairy above, densely white or rusty hairy below (Stanley and Ross, 1983 in PIER, 2002). The flowers are white and borne in clusters. The berries are red and about 1cm across (PIER, 2002). There are five taxonomic varieties, two of which are outlined below.
R. Moluccanus var. moluccanus: leaves are shallowly lobed, has erect brown-yellow hairs on leaf stalks and branchlets, white petals.
R.moluccanus var.trilobus: distinct 3-lobed leaf, appressed greyish hairs on leaf stalks and branchlets, mostly pink petals (Bean, 2001).
Notes
A serious pest on the Mascarene Islands in the Indian Ocean (PIER, 2002). On U.S. Federal noxious weed list, as well as being classed as noxious in Florida and South Carolina (Plants Database, 2002).
Plants in the Rubus genus are known to be susceptible to honey fungus (Huxley, 1992 in Plants for a Future, 2002).
Uses
Leaves are abortifacient, astringent and emmenagogue. Fruit can be used as a remedy for bed-wetting in children (Chopra et al. 1983 in Plants for a Future, 2002). A purple-blue dye can also be made from the fruit (Grae, 1974 in Plants for a Future, 2002). Aboriginal people in Australia utilise the berries, which can be made into jams, jellies and pies. Tea brewed from the leaves can be used to treat diarrhea (Notman, 2000).
Habitat Description
Favours wet lowland areas (PIER, 2002). Occurs in rainforest edges in Australia (Notman, 2000). Grows to 2100m. elevation in the Himalayas (Chopra et. al. 1986 in Plants for a Future, 2002).
Reproduction
Flowers are insect-pollinated. Fruits are dispersed by birds (PIER, 2002). Roots can grow from the point at which a branch touches the ground (Mallinson, 1998).
Nutrition
Needs a good deal of sunlight for best flowering and fruiting, although can tolerate semi-shade. Has a high water requirement and does not tolerate poorly drained soil (Plants for a Future, 2002).

Principal source:

Compiler: IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG)

Review:

Publication date: 2005-12-30

Recommended citation: Global Invasive Species Database (2016) Species profile: Rubus moluccanus. Downloaded from http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=476 on 27-08-2016.

General Impacts
No specific information is available for this species, but as it is closely related to R. rosifolius, its impacts may be similar, namely:
Threatens native plants through overcrowding and competition. The prickly stems may pose a hazard to humans and livestock (Mallinson, 1998).
Management Info
No specific management information was found for R. moluccanus, but techniques used for the control of blackberry (Rubus fruticosus agg.), which is a related species, may be applicable. These are outlined below.

\r\nMechanical control: Tractor and rotary slasher, hand cutting.

\r\nChemical: There are a range of herbicides that can be used for the control of blackberry, including those that are glyphosate-based, such as Roundup®. These are usually applied by spraying, using a knapsack or mistblower for smaller infestations, or handgun and hose for larger ones (Mallinson, 1998).

\r\nBiological: Maintenance of soil fertility and pasture may reduce infestations. Goats (Capra hircus) are able to control infestations through grazing. Care must be taken with this approach however, as goats are a known invasive species as well.

Countries (or multi-country features) with distribution records for Rubus moluccanus
ALIEN RANGE
NATIVE RANGE
  • australia
  • fiji
  • himalayas
  • indonesia
  • malaysia
  • micronesia, federated states of
  • new caledonia
  • new guinea
  • philippines
  • solomon islands
  • thailand
  • vanuatu
  • viet nam
Informations on Rubus moluccanus has been recorded for the following locations. Click on the name for additional informations.
Lorem Ipsum
Location Status Invasiveness Occurrence Source
Details of Rubus moluccanus in information
Status
Invasiveness
Arrival date
Occurrence
Source
Introduction
Species notes for this location
Location note
Management notes for this location
Impact
Mechanism:
Outcome:
Ecosystem services:
Impact information
No specific information is available for this species, but as it is closely related to R. rosifolius, its impacts may be similar, namely:
Threatens native plants through overcrowding and competition. The prickly stems may pose a hazard to humans and livestock (Mallinson, 1998).
Red List assessed species 0:
Management information
No specific management information was found for R. moluccanus, but techniques used for the control of blackberry (Rubus fruticosus agg.), which is a related species, may be applicable. These are outlined below.

\r\nMechanical control: Tractor and rotary slasher, hand cutting.

\r\nChemical: There are a range of herbicides that can be used for the control of blackberry, including those that are glyphosate-based, such as Roundup®. These are usually applied by spraying, using a knapsack or mistblower for smaller infestations, or handgun and hose for larger ones (Mallinson, 1998).

\r\nBiological: Maintenance of soil fertility and pasture may reduce infestations. Goats (Capra hircus) are able to control infestations through grazing. Care must be taken with this approach however, as goats are a known invasive species as well.

Bibliography
10 references found for Rubus moluccanus

Managment information
Mallinson, R. 1998. Environment (B.O.P) Bay of Plenty.
Summary: An excellent source of information on the control of blackberry (Rubus fruticosus agg.). Methods outlined may be applicable for control of invasive populations of Rubus moluccanus. Outlines, methods and equipment for mechanical control, pasture & stock management, and herbicide use.
PIER (Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk), 2002. Rubus moluccanus
Summary: Ecology, synonyms, common names, distributions (Pacific as well as global), management and impact information.
Available from: http://www.hear.org/pier/species/rubus_moluccanus.htm [Accessed 5 February 2003].
General information
Bean, T. 2001. Australian Plants Online, Queensland Raspberries. Number 22, ISSN 1326-7469.
Summary: Contains a good summary of general information about the native Rubus species in Queensland, Australia.
Binggeli, Pierre. Introduced and invasive plants, (in press) In Goodman S.M. and J.P. Benstead (Eds) The natural history of Madagascar. Woody plant Ecology.
Summary: Distribution information.
CONABIO. 2008. Sistema de informaci�n sobre especies invasoras en M�xico. Especies invasoras - Plantas. Comisi�n Nacional para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad. Fecha de acceso.
Summary: English:
The species list sheet for the Mexican information system on invasive species currently provides information related to Scientific names, family, group and common names, as well as habitat, status of invasion in Mexico, pathways of introduction and links to other specialised websites. Some of the higher risk species already have a direct link to the alert page. It is important to notice that these lists are constantly being updated, please refer to the main page (http://www.conabio.gob.mx/invasoras/index.php/Portada), under the section Novedades for information on updates.
Invasive species - Plants is available from: http://www.conabio.gob.mx/invasoras/index.php/Especies_invasoras_-_Plantas [Accessed 30 July 2008]
Spanish:
La lista de especies del Sistema de informaci�n sobre especies invasoras de m�xico cuenta actualmente con informaci�n aceca de nombre cient�fico, familia, grupo y nombre com�n, as� como h�bitat, estado de la invasi�n en M�xico, rutas de introducci�n y ligas a otros sitios especializados. Algunas de las especies de mayor riesgo ya tienen una liga directa a la p�gina de alertas. Es importante resaltar que estas listas se encuentran en constante proceso de actualizaci�n, por favor consulte la portada (http://www.conabio.gob.mx/invasoras/index.php/Portada), en la secci�n novedades, para conocer los cambios.
Especies invasoras - Plantas is available from: http://www.conabio.gob.mx/invasoras/index.php/Especies_invasoras_-_Plantas [Accessed 30 July 2008]
ITIS (Integrated Taxonomic Information System), 2005. Online Database Rubus moluccanus
Summary: An online database that provides taxonomic information, common names, synonyms and geographical jurisdiction of a species. In addition links are provided to retrieve biological records and collection information from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) Data Portal and bioscience articles from BioOne journals.
Available from: http://www.cbif.gc.ca/pls/itisca/taxastep?king=every&p_action=containing&taxa=Rubus+moluccanus&p_format=&p_ifx=plglt&p_lang= [Accessed March 2005]
Notman, A. 2000. Molucca bramble. Rumbalara Environmental Centre.
Summary: An Australian site with information on the use of R. moluccanus as bush tucker , or food. Contains a small amount of nutritional information.
Plants Database, 2002. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).
Summary: Comprehensive information concerning taxonomy, distribution, life-history and ecology.
Available from: http://plants.usda.gov/cgi_bin/topics.cgi [Accessed 29 January 2003].
Plants For A Future, 2002. Rubus moluccanus
Summary: A searchable database and resource and information centre for edible and other useful plants.
Available from: http://plants.usda.gov/cgi_bin/topics.cgi [Accessed 5 February 2003].
Contact
The following 0 contacts offer information an advice on Rubus moluccanus