Global invasive species database

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  • A close up of Pinus pinaster bark (Photo: Jos� Manuel S�nchez de Lorenzo C�ceres, Spain)
  • Pinus pinaster tree (Photo: Jos� Manuel S�nchez de Lorenzo C�ceres, Spain)
  • Pinus pinaster cone (Photo: USGS-BRD Haleakala Field Station)
  • Pinus pinaster fruit (Photo: Jos� Manuel S�nchez de Lorenzo C�ceres, Spain)
  • Pinus pinaster (Photo: Forest & Kim Starr (USGS))
  • Pinus pinaster (Photo: Forest & Kim Starr (USGS))
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Common name
maritime pine (English), cluster pine (English)
Synonym
Pinus maritima
Pinus mesogeneensid
Similar species
Summary
Pinus pinaster, originally from the Mediterranean Basin, has been planted in temperate regions within and outside its natural range for a wide range of reasons. It regenerates readily almost everywhere it is planted and in many places it invades natural shrubland, forest and grassland. Pinus pinaster forms dense thickets which supress native plants, changes fire regimes and hydrological properties and alters habitats for many animals.
Species Description
An evergreen coniferous tree, growing 20-35m tall, with 2 needle-shaped leaves per fascicle (leaves usually 15-20cm long and stiff). Cones 10-22cm long.
Reproduction
Pinus pinaster reproduces exclusively from seeds (it does not sprout). The small, winged seeds are held in serotinous cones. Some seeds are released every year, especially during hot spells when cones open partially. Trees have thin bark and a poor re

Principal source:

Compiler: Dr. Dave Richardson, University of Capetown & IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG)

Review: Dr. Dave Richardson, University of Capetown

Publication date: 2005-06-16

Recommended citation: Global Invasive Species Database (2016) Species profile: Pinus pinaster. Downloaded from http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=43 on 10-12-2016.

General Impacts
This species regenerates profusely after fire, often resulting in dense thickets of plants close to killed adult plants. These dense thickets supress native plants, change fire regimes and hydrological properties and alter habitats for many animals.
Management Info
Physical: Mechanical control is currently the most effective way of dealing with invasive Pinus pinaster stands. All plants are felled and allowed to lie for 12-18 months.
Countries (or multi-country features) with distribution records for Pinus pinaster
ALIEN RANGE
NATIVE RANGE
  • algeria
  • france
  • italy
  • morocco
  • spain
Informations on Pinus pinaster has been recorded for the following locations. Click on the name for additional informations.
Lorem Ipsum
Location Status Invasiveness Occurrence Source
Details of Pinus pinaster in information
Status
Invasiveness
Arrival date
Occurrence
Source
Introduction
Species notes for this location
Location note
Management notes for this location
Impact
Mechanism:
Outcome:
Ecosystem services:
Impact information
This species regenerates profusely after fire, often resulting in dense thickets of plants close to killed adult plants. These dense thickets supress native plants, change fire regimes and hydrological properties and alter habitats for many animals.
Red List assessed species 0:
Management information
Physical: Mechanical control is currently the most effective way of dealing with invasive Pinus pinaster stands. All plants are felled and allowed to lie for 12-18 months.
Locations
NEW ZEALAND
Management Category
Control
Bibliography
13 references found for Pinus pinaster

Managment information
General information
Baret, S., Rouget, M., Richardson, D. M., Lavergne, C., Egoh, B., Dupont, J., & Strasberg, D. 2006. Current distribution and potential extent of the most invasive alien plant species on La R�union (Indian Ocean, Mascarene islands). Austral Ecology, 31, 747-758.
Summary: L objectif de ce papier est d identifier les zones prioritaires en mati�re de gestion des invasions biologiques � La R�union en mod�lisant la distribution actuelle et potentiellle d une s�lection de plantes parmi les plus envahissantes.
Conservatoire Botanique National De Mascarin (BOULLET V. coord.) 2007. - Pinus pinaster Index de la flore vasculaire de la R�union (Trach�ophytes) : statuts, menaces et protections. - Version 2007.1
Summary: Base de donn�es sur la flore de la R�union. De nombreuses informations tr�s utiles.
Available from: http://flore.cbnm.org/index2.php?page=taxon&num=d3e2e8f631bd9336ed25b8162aef8782 [Accessed 9 April 2008]
Higgins, S. I., Richardson, D. M. and Cowling, R. M. 2000. Using a dynamic landscape model for planning the management of alien plant invasions. Ecological Applications (in press).
Higgins, S. I., Richardson, D. M., Cowling, R. M. and Trinder-Smith, T. H. 1999. Predicting the landscape-scale distribution of alien plants and their threat to plant diversity. Conservation Biology 13: 303-313.
Hunter, G. S. and Douglas, M. H. 1984. Spread of exotic conifers on South Island rangelands. New Zealand Journal of Forestry 29: 78-96.
ITIS (Integrated Taxonomic Information System), 2005. Online Database Pinus pinaster
Summary: An online database that provides taxonomic information, common names, synonyms and geographical jurisdiction of a species. In addition links are provided to retrieve biological records and collection information from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) Data Portal and bioscience articles from BioOne journals.
Available from: http://www.cbif.gc.ca/pls/itisca/taxastep?king=every&p_action=containing&taxa=Pinus+pinaster&p_format=&p_ifx=plglt&p_lang= [Accessed March 2005]
Kueffer, C. & Lavergne, C. 2004. Case studies on the status of invasive woody plant species in the Western Indian Ocean. R�union. FAO. 36 p
Summary: Available from: http://www.fao.org/forestry/webview/media?mediaId=6842&langId=2 [Accessed 26 March 2008]
Moll, E. J. and Trinder-Smith, T. H. 1992. Invasion and control of alien woody plants on the Cape Peninsula Mountains, South Africa - 30 years on. Biological Conservation 60: 135-143.
Richardson, D. M. and Cowling, R. M. 1994. The ecology of invasive pines (Pinus spp.) in the Jonkershoek valley, Stellenbosch, South Africa. Bontebok 9: 1-14.
Richardson, D. M. and Higgins, S. I. 1998. Pines as invaders in the Southern Hemisphere. In Richardson, D. M. (ed.) Ecology and biogeography of Pinus. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge: 450-473.
Richardson D. M, Cowling R. M and Le Maitre D. C., 1990. Assessing the risk of invasive success in Pinus and Banksia in South African mountain fynbos. Journal of Vegetation Science 1: 629�642
Contact
The following 2 contacts offer information an advice on Pinus pinaster
Lavergne,
Christophe
Geographic region: Indian Ocean
Ecosystem: Terrestrial
Organization:
Conservatoire Botanique National de Mascarin
Address:
2 rue du P�re Georges Domaine des Colima�ons 97436 SAINT LEU
Phone:
(33) 02 62 24 92 27
Fax:
Triolo,
Julien
Geographic region: Indian Ocean
Ecosystem: Terrestrial
Organization:
Office National des For�ts
Address:
ONF. Domaine Forestier de la Providence, 97488 Saint Denis cedex
Phone:
692345283
Fax: