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  • Mimosa leaves (Photo: Colin Wilson, Parks & Wildlife Commission, Nothern Territory, Australia)
  • Mimosa leaves (Photo: Colin Wilson, Parks & Wildlife Commission, Nothern Territory, Australia)
  • Mimosa tree (Photo: Colin Wilson, Parks & Wildlife Commission, Nothern Territory, Australia)
  • Mimosa flowers (Photo: Colin Wilson, Parks & Wildlife Commission, Nothern Territory, Australia)
  • Mimosa fruit (Photo: Colin Wilson, Parks & Wildlife Commission, Nothern Territory, Australia)
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Common name
trinh nu nhon (English, North Vietnam), xao ho (English, South Vietnam), putri malu (Indonesian Bahasa), maiyarap ton (Thai), chi yop (Thai), semalu gajah (Malay), mimose (German), giant trembling plant (English), catclaw (English, Puerto Rico), mimosa (English), giant sensitive plant (English), giant sensitive tree (English), bashful plant (English), catclaw mimosa (English), columbi-da-lagoa (Portuguese), juquiri (Portuguese), juquiri grand (Portuguese), malicia-de-boi (Portuguese), eomrmidera (Spanish), espino (Spanish), sensitiva (Spanish), una de gato (Spanish), mai yah raap yak (Thai), kembang gajah (Malay)
Synonym
Mimosa pellita
Similar species
Summary
Mimosa pigra is invasive, especially in parts of South East Asia and Australia. It reproduces via buoyant seed pods that can be spread long distances in flood waters. Mimosa pigra has the potential to spread through natural grassland floodplain ecosystems and pastures, converting them into unproductive scrubland which are only able to sustain lower levels of biodiversity. In Thailand Mimosa pigra blocks irrigation systems that supply rice fields, reducing crop yield and harming farming livelihoods. In Vietnam it has invaded unique ecosystems in protected areas, threatening the biodiversity of seasonally inundated grasslands.
Species Description
When mature, Mimosa pigra is an erect, much branched prickly shrub reaching a height of 3m to 6m. Stems are greenish at first but become woody, are up to 3m long, and have randomly scattered, slightly recurved prickles 0.5cm tocm long. Leaves are bright green, 20cm to 25cm long and bipinnate, consisting of about 15 pairs of opposite primary segments 5cm long with sessile, narrowly lanceolate leaflets that fold together when touched or injured and at night. The flowers are pink or mauve, small, regular and grouped into globular heads 1cm to 2cm in diameter. The heads are borne on stalks 2cm to 3cm long, with two in each leaf axil, while the corolla has four lobes with eight pink stamens. The fruit is a thick hairy, 20-25 seeded, flattened pod borne in groups in the leaf axils, each 6.5cm to 7.5cm long and 0.7cm to 1cm wide. The fruit turns brown when mature, breaking into one-seeded segments. The seeds are brown or olive green, oblong, flattened, 4mm to 6mm long, and 2mm wide (Walden et al. 1999).
Lifecycle Stages
Plants mature quickly and can set seed in their first year of growth (Walden et al. 1999). Flowering may begin 6 to 8 months following germination. Flowers are bee-pollinated and possibly wind-pollinated. Plants are thought to be self-compatible. Flowers develop in about 7 to 9 days, and seed pods in about 25 days. M. pigra fruits and flowers all year round in the Mekong Delta, but its main fruiting season occurs during the dry season (December to May) (Triet et al Undated).\r\n
Seeds are extremely hardy and can remain dormant for more than 15 years depending on the environment. For example, half of a seed population was no longer viable after 99 weeks at a depth of 10cm in a light clay soil, while a similar loss in viability was observed after only 9 weeks in heavier cracking clay (Lonsdale et al. 1988, in Walden et al. 1999). In sandy soils the lifespan of seeds may be much longer. Dormancy of seeds in the soil is broken by expansion and contraction of the hard seed-coat by temperature changes ranging from about 25–70°C. Seeds buried deeper than 10cm generally do not successfully germinate unless brought to the surface (Walden et al. 1999).
Habitat Description
Mimosa favours a wet-dry tropical climate and grows in open, moist sites such as floodplains, coastal plains and river banks. For example, in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam, where it is a serious weed annual rainfall levels may reach up to 2200cm. It may not be a major problem in regions with an annual rainfall of less than 75mm or greater than 2250mm. In both Australia and Vietnam it prefers to invade seasonally inundated grassland (Walden et al. 1999; Triet et al Undated). \r\n

It is more likely to colonise and eventually cause problems in disturbed areas. This is due to the ability of Mimosa seeds to establish rapidly on bare soils, which lack competitive pressures imposed by other seedlings (Lonsdale and Braithwaite 1988, in Walden et al. 1999). It is common along the edges of reservoirs, canals, river banks and roadside ditches, and in agricultural lands and overgrazed floodplains (Walden et al. 1999). In Vietnam it is typically found along the edge of both natural and manmade water bodies and along roadsides (Triet et al Undated). In Australia it is known to spread very rapidly within overgrazed rangelands, and within Costa Rica (part of its native range) it is common in overgrazed areas (Walden et al. 1999; Boucher et al. 1983, in Walden et al. 1999). \r\n

Mimosa does not appear to grow preferentially in any soil type, but is found most commonly in soils ranging from black cracking clays to sandy clays to coarse siliceous river sand. Seed production and plant life expectancy are greater on black cracking clays than on the lighter clays and silty loams (Lonsdale 1992).

Reproduction
Seeds are produced in individual segments of seed-pods that ‘burst’ apart when mature (Walden et al. 1999). Under optimal conditions annual seed production may reach up to 220,000 per plant.
A study carried out within the Mekong Delta found that the average number of seeds in the topsoil was 100 seeds per metre squared (Triet et al Undated). In contrast, an average of 12,000 seeds per metre squared was reported for a mimosa-infested area in northern Australia (Lonsdale 1992, in Triet et al Undated).
Pathway
Mimosa was probably introduced to the Northern Territory (Australia) via the Darwin Botanic Gardens. This may have been due to accidental contamination of seed samples. Alternatively it may have been introduced intentionally due to its unusual sensitive leaves (Miller and Lonsdale 1987, in Walden et al. 1999).Mimosa has been introduced and planted to reduce erosion (Walden et al. 1999).Mimosa has been introduced to new regions as an ornamental (Walden et al. 1999). .The seeds may adhere to vehicles or other machinery (Lonsdale et al. 1985, in Walden et al. 1999).

Principal source: Pacific Islands Ecosystems at Risk, (PIER, 2002)

Compiler: Colin Wilson, Parks & Wildlife Commission of the Northern Territory & IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG)\r\nPalmerston, Australia.
Annie Lane, Northern Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries, Resource Management Division, Australia.

Review: Colin Wilson, Parks and Wildlife Commission of the Northern Territory, Australia.
Annie Lane, Northern Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries, Australia.

Publication date: 2006-07-19

Recommended citation: Global Invasive Species Database (2016) Species profile: Mimosa pigra. Downloaded from http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=41 on 25-09-2016.

General Impacts
River floodplains and swamp forests in northern Australia are threatened by dense thickets of Mimosa pigra. The weed supports fewer numbers of birds and lizards, less herbaceous plants and fewer tree seedlings. It prevents traditional food gathering by Aborigines on otherwise resource rich wetlands.\r\n
M. pigra has the potential to harm a wide number and variety of different types of primary production. If large infestations occur over farmland, mimosa may threaten the health of pastoral industries by reducing the area of grazing land and the carrying capacity of the land. Furthermore, if livestock are reliant on natural water sources for drinking, their access to water may be blocked. As a result, meat production and income may be reduced (Praneetvatakul 2001). \r\n
M. pigra may reduce water flow and increase silt levels, as it commonly colonises water course edges. This may threaten the sustainability of reservoirs and canals and any livelihoods reliant on them. For example, the weed negatively impacts rice cultivation in Thailand by blocking irrigation inlets (as well as encouraging increases in the numbers of rats and crabs, which damage crops) (Praneetvatakul 2001). \r\n
M. pigra may interference with the cultivation of other economically-important plants. For example, M. pigra is able to compete with the young palm trees in immature oil palm plantations. This may cause a decrease in the production of palm oil (Praneetvatakul 2001).\r\n
Common along roadsides, mimosa may also increase the costs of maintaining power poles and cables used for electricity transmission. It may also decrease driver visibility, increasing the potential for traffic accidents (Praneetvatakul 2001).
Management Info
Preventative measures: Preventative weed control is the most cost efficient form of weed management. Comprehensive surveys should ensure isolated infestations are identified and targeted before they expand to uncontrollable levels. Educating the community is also an important tool. Restricting the movement of vehicles, stock, stock feed, soil and sand from infested areas is important to prevent the spread of mimosa seeds (Walden et al. 1999).

A Risk Assessment of Mimosa pigra for Hawai‘i and other Pacific islands was prepared by Dr. Curtis Daehler (UH Botany) with funding from the Kaulunani Urban Forestry Program and US Forest Service. The alien plant screening system is derived from Pheloung et al. (1999) with minor modifications for use in Pacific islands (Daehler et al. 2004). The result is a score of 25 and a recommendation of: \"Likely to cause significant ecological or economic harm in Hawai‘i and on other Pacific Islands as determined by a high WRA score, which is based on published sources describing species biology and behaviour in Hawai‘i and/or other parts of the world.\"

A Risk assessment of Mimosa pigra for Australia was prepared by Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER) using the Australian risk assessment system (Pheloung, 1995). The result is a score of 23 and a recommendation of: reject the plant for import (Australia) or species likely to be a pest (Pacific).

\r\nClick here for Information about biological, physical and chemical control of Mimosa pigra.

Countries (or multi-country features) with distribution records for Mimosa pigra
Informations on Mimosa pigra has been recorded for the following locations. Click on the name for additional informations.
Lorem Ipsum
Location Status Invasiveness Occurrence Source
Details of Mimosa pigra in information
Status
Invasiveness
Arrival date
Occurrence
Source
Introduction
Species notes for this location
Location note
Management notes for this location
Impact
Mechanism:
Outcome:
Ecosystem services:
Impact information
River floodplains and swamp forests in northern Australia are threatened by dense thickets of Mimosa pigra. The weed supports fewer numbers of birds and lizards, less herbaceous plants and fewer tree seedlings. It prevents traditional food gathering by Aborigines on otherwise resource rich wetlands.\r\n
M. pigra has the potential to harm a wide number and variety of different types of primary production. If large infestations occur over farmland, mimosa may threaten the health of pastoral industries by reducing the area of grazing land and the carrying capacity of the land. Furthermore, if livestock are reliant on natural water sources for drinking, their access to water may be blocked. As a result, meat production and income may be reduced (Praneetvatakul 2001). \r\n
M. pigra may reduce water flow and increase silt levels, as it commonly colonises water course edges. This may threaten the sustainability of reservoirs and canals and any livelihoods reliant on them. For example, the weed negatively impacts rice cultivation in Thailand by blocking irrigation inlets (as well as encouraging increases in the numbers of rats and crabs, which damage crops) (Praneetvatakul 2001). \r\n
M. pigra may interference with the cultivation of other economically-important plants. For example, M. pigra is able to compete with the young palm trees in immature oil palm plantations. This may cause a decrease in the production of palm oil (Praneetvatakul 2001).\r\n
Common along roadsides, mimosa may also increase the costs of maintaining power poles and cables used for electricity transmission. It may also decrease driver visibility, increasing the potential for traffic accidents (Praneetvatakul 2001).
Red List assessed species 2: CR = 1; LC = 1;
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Locations
AUSTRALIA
GUINEA
INDONESIA
KENYA
MALAYSIA
PAPUA NEW GUINEA
South East Asia
TANZANIA, UNITED REPUBLIC OF
THAILAND
UGANDA
Mechanism
[9] Competition
[1] Rooting/Digging
[1] Interaction with other invasive species
[1] Other
Outcomes
[3] Environmental Ecosystem - Habitat
  • [1] Modification of hydrology/water regulation, purification and quality /soil moisture
  • [1] Reduction in native biodiversity
  • [1] Habitat degradation
[1] Environmental Species - Population
  • [1] Alteration of genetic resources
[13] Socio-Economic
  • [9] Damage to agriculture
  • [1] Damage on aquaculture/mariculture/fishery
  • [1] Damage to infrastructures
  • [1] Alteration of recreational use and tourism
  • [1] Limited access to water, land and other
Management information
Preventative measures: Preventative weed control is the most cost efficient form of weed management. Comprehensive surveys should ensure isolated infestations are identified and targeted before they expand to uncontrollable levels. Educating the community is also an important tool. Restricting the movement of vehicles, stock, stock feed, soil and sand from infested areas is important to prevent the spread of mimosa seeds (Walden et al. 1999).

A Risk Assessment of Mimosa pigra for Hawai‘i and other Pacific islands was prepared by Dr. Curtis Daehler (UH Botany) with funding from the Kaulunani Urban Forestry Program and US Forest Service. The alien plant screening system is derived from Pheloung et al. (1999) with minor modifications for use in Pacific islands (Daehler et al. 2004). The result is a score of 25 and a recommendation of: \"Likely to cause significant ecological or economic harm in Hawai‘i and on other Pacific Islands as determined by a high WRA score, which is based on published sources describing species biology and behaviour in Hawai‘i and/or other parts of the world.\"

A Risk assessment of Mimosa pigra for Australia was prepared by Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER) using the Australian risk assessment system (Pheloung, 1995). The result is a score of 23 and a recommendation of: reject the plant for import (Australia) or species likely to be a pest (Pacific).

\r\nClick here for Information about biological, physical and chemical control of Mimosa pigra.

Bibliography
41 references found for Mimosa pigra

Managment information
Buckley, Y.M., Rees, M., Paynter, Q., Lonsdale, M. 2004. Modelling integrated weed management of an invasive shrub in tropical Australia, Journal of Applied Ecology 41(3).
Csurhes, S. and Edwards, R., 1998. Potential environmental weeds in Australia: candidate species for preventative control. Queensland Department of Natural Resources.
Daehler, C.C; Denslow, J.S; Ansari, S and Huang-Chi, K., 2004. A Risk-Assessment System for Screening Out Invasive Pest Plants from Hawaii and Other Pacific Islands. Conservation Biology Volume 18 Issue 2 Page 360.
Summary: A study on the use of a screening system to assess proposed plant introductions to Hawaii or other Pacific Islands and to identify high-risk species used in horticulture and forestry which would greatly reduce future pest-plant problems and allow entry of most nonpests.
Dickman, C. R. 1996. Overview of the impacts of feral cats on Australian native fauna. Canberra: Australian Nature Conservation Agency.
Holding, D. Undated. Mimosa Factsheet Co-operative Research Centre for Australian Weed Management.
Kriwoken, L. K. and Hedge, P. 2000. Exotic species and estuaries: managing Spartina anglica in Tasmania, Australia. Ocean and Coastal Management 43: 573-584.
Lonsdale, W. M., Miller, I. L. and Forno, I. W. 1995. Mimosa pigra L.. The Biology of Australian Weeds, Volume 1. Groves, R. H., Shepherd, R. C. H. and Richardson, R. G. (eds.). R. G. & F. J. Richardson, Melbourne: 169-188.
Summary: A complete review of the species giving details of name, description of the plant, history, distribution, habitat, growth and development, reproduction, population dynamics, importance, legislation, and weed management.
Pacific Invasives Initiative (PII), 2006. Management of the Invasive Tree Mimosa Pigra in Madang, Papua New Guinea.
Summary: Available from: http://www.issg.org/cii/PII/Mimosa.htm [Accessed 27 March 2006]
Parkes, J., Henzell, R. and Pickles, G. 1996. Managing Vertebrate Pests: Feral Goats. Australian Government Publishing Service: 129pp.
Summary: A comprehensive review of the history and biology of feral goats in Australia, the damage they cause, and community attitudes to feral goat management. A wide range of strategies for goat control are discussed and recommended.
Paynter, Q. 2003. Integrated weed management: effect of herbicide choice and timing of application on the survival of a biological control agent of the tropical wetland weed, Mimosa pigra, Biological Control 26(2): 162-167.
Paynter, Q. and Flanagan, G.J. 2004. Integrating herbicide and mechanical control treatments with fire and biological control to manage an invasive wetland shrub, Mimosa pigra , Journal of Applied Ecology 41(4).
Paynter, Q., Hennecke, B. 2001. Competition Between Two Biological Control Agents, Neurostrota gunniella and Phloeospora mimosae-pigrae, and Their Impact on the Invasive Tropical Shrub Mimosa pigra, Biocontrol Science and Technology 11(5): 575 � 582.
PIER (Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk), 2002. Mimosa pigra
Summary: Ecology, synonyms, common names, distributions (Pacific as well as global), management and impact information.
Available from: http://www.hear.org/pier/species/mimosa_pigra.htm [Accessed 5 February 2003].
Praneetvatakul, S. 2001. An Impact Assessment of ACIAR Research Projects on Biological Control in Thailand. Kasetsart University (Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics): Bangkok. In: S. Isvilanonda, S. Praneetvatakul, C. Sangkapituk, A. Sattarasart, C. Singhaprecha and P. Sirisupluxana. 2001. Impact Assessments of Forty-nine Thailand/Australia Collaborative Projects Funded by ACIAR during 1983�1995 (Working Paper Series No. 38).
Rash, J. E., Williamson, R. C. and Taylor, S. J. 1995. How green is your mudflat? Proceedings of the Australasian conference on Spartina control. Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Yarram, Victoria, Australia.
Summary: Collection of papers about the history of Spartina invasions in Australia and New Zealand and subsequent control attempts.
Sanderson, J. C. 1990. A preliminary survey of the distribution of the introduced macroalga, Undaria pinnatifida (Harvey) suringar on the coast of Tasmania, Australia. Botanica Marina 33: 153-157.
Schatz, T.J. 2001. The effect of cutting on the survival Mimosa pigra and its application to the use of blade ploughing as a control method, Plant Protection Quarterly 16(2)
Swaziland s Alien Plants Database., Undated. Mimosa pigra
Summary: A database of Swaziland s alien plant species.
Tran Triet, Le Cong Kiet, Nguyen Thi Lan Thi and Pham Quoc Dan (undated). The invasion by Mimosa pigra of wetlands of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.
Summary: Abstract: The Mekong River Delta is a wetland complex, covering an area of approximately five million hectares, of which about four million hectares are in Vietnam, the rest in Cambodia. Recent inventory showed that environmental weeds made up about 10% of the natural flora of the Mekong Delta. Of those alien plants, mimosa, Mimosa pigra L., is among the most serious. This paper provides a synopsis of mimosa invasion on wetlands of the Mekong Delta, and discusses its distribution, habitat preference, morphology, phenology, seed bank, proliferation and current efforts to control mimosa in two wetland national parks, Tram Chim (Dong Thap Province) and U Minh Thuong (Kien Giang Province). The first record of mimosa in the Mekong Delta was collected in 1979 in Moc Hoa District, Long An Province. The weed is now found in all 12 provinces of the Mekong Delta, mostly in the freshwater region influenced by floodwater from the Mekong River. A map of mimosa infestation areas in the Mekong Delta is provided, together with discussions on habitat preference and measurements of plant biological characteristics. The invasion by mimosa has been monitored in the two national parks since 1999. At U Minh Thuong, the invasion of mimosa was detected early, and the eradication was completed with little cost, using manual removal methods. At Tram Chim, however, the infestation has increased beyond easy management. Since 2000, the infestation area in Tram Chim has doubled every year. Maps of mimosa in Tram Chim 2000 �2002 are presented. Experiences with mimosa in Tram Chim and U Minh Thuong demonstrate that awareness and early intervention are key factors of a successful weed-management program, particularly in the context of developing countries where there is often a lack of funding and expertise for comprehensive weed control practices.
Available from http://www.ento.csiro.au/weeds/pdf/mimosa_symposium/07Trietetal.pdf [Accessed 10 November, 2004]
Twyford, K. L., Humphrey, P. G., Nunn, R. P. and Willoughby, L. 2000. Eradication of feral cats (Felis catus) from Gabo Island, southeast Victoria. Ecological Management 1: 42-49.
Williams 1995. Managing Vertebrate Pests: Rabbits. CSIRO. Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra.
Summary: A management handbook for rabbits in Australia.
General information
Crane, J.H., Balerdi, C.F. and Klassen,W. 2002. Section 4: Common Weeds Found in Tropical Fruit Orchards in South Florida. In: R.L. Degner, T.J. Stevens and K.L. Morgan (Eds.) Major Production Problems Affecting Miami-Dada Agriculture and Emerging Technological Developments.
Foxcroft, L.C. and Richardson, D.M. 2003. Managing alien plant invasions in the Kruger National Park. Pp. 385-403 in: Child, L.E., Brock, J.H., Brundu, G., Prach, K., Pysek, P., Wade, P.M. and Williamson, M. 2003. Plant invasions: Ecological threats and management solutions. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Summary: The paper outlines the problem of alien plant invasions in the Kruger National Park, South Africa.
Garnett, S.T. and Crowley, G.M. 2000. Taxon Summary: Magpie Goose. In: The Action Plan for Australian Birds. 2000. Environment Australia.
Summary: Available from: http://www.deh.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/action/birds2000/cont.html [Accessed 18 March 2005]
ITIS (Integrated Taxonomic Information System), 2005. Online Database Mimosa pigra
Summary: An online database that provides taxonomic information, common names, synonyms and geographical jurisdiction of a species. In addition links are provided to retrieve biological records and collection information from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) Data Portal and bioscience articles from BioOne journals.
Available from: http://www.cbif.gc.ca/pls/itisca/taxastep?king=every&p_action=containing&taxa=Mimosa+pigra&p_format=&p_ifx=plglt&p_lang= [Accessed March 2005]
Langeland, K.A. and Burks, K. C (Eds) 1998. Identification and Biology of Non-Native Plants in Florida s Natural Areas, University of Florida. Mimosa pigra
Summary: Information on plants that pose threats to natural resource areas in Florida.
Available from: http://www.fleppc.org/ID_book/mimosa%20pigra.pdf [Accessed 30 December 2004]
Mumba, M. 2005. Musonda Mumba.
Parks and Wildlife Commission. Undated a Threatened Species of the Northern Territory: Yellow Chat (Alligator Rivers Subspecies) Epthianura crocea tunneyi. Parks and Wildlife Commission: Northern Territory.
Parks and Wildlife Commission. Undated b Threatened Species of the Northern Territory: Bare-rumped Sheathtail bat Saccoilamus saccoilamus. Parks and Wildlife Commission: Northern Territory.
Parks and Wildlife Commission. Undated c. Threatened Species of the Northern Territory: Arnhem Sheathtail bat Taphozous kapalgensis. Parks and Wildlife Commission: Northern Territory.
Tan Vy, N. Hoang Hao, N., Thi Ngoc Thin, N. and Duy Thuc, P. 2003. Water-related Birds Survey in Cat Tien National Park, Vietnam 2003. Cat Tien National Park Conservation Project.
Tram Chim. Undated. In: Directory of Important Bird Areas in Vietnam. BirdLife International in Indochina and the Institute of Ecology and Biological Resources.
Contact
The following 15 contacts offer information an advice on Mimosa pigra
Berman,
David
Expert on rabbits in Australia
Organization:
Robert Wicks Research Centre
Address:
203 Tor Street, Toowoomba, QLD 4350, Australia.
Phone:
Fax:
Cooke,
Brian
Expert on rabbits in Australia
Organization:
CSIRO Wildlife and Ecology
Address:

Phone:
Fax:
Graham,
Nugent
Feral goats and feral pigs
Organization:
Manaaki Whenua - Landcare Research
Address:
P.O. Box 69, Lincoln, New Zealand
Phone:
Fax:
Hedge,
Paul
Spartina anglica - Australia
Organization:
Marine Environmental Management Officer, Marine Resources
Address:
Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries, GPO Box 44A, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia
Phone:
+61 3 62336138
Fax:
+61 3 62333065
Lane,
Annie
Mimosa pigra
Organization:
Northern Department of Primary Industtry and Fisheries
Address:
Resource Management Division GPO Box 990 DARWIN NT 0821, Australia.
Phone:
+61 8 89992099
Fax:
+61 8 89992049
Lane,
Annie
Mimosa pigra
Organization:
Northern Department of Primary Industtry and Fisheries
Address:
Resource Management Division GPO Box 990 DARWIN NT 0821, Australia.
Phone:
+61 8 89992099
Fax:
+61 8 89992049
Lonsdale,
Mark
Mimosa pigra - Australia
Organization:
CSIRO Division of Entomology
Address:
GPO Box 1700, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia
Phone:
+61 2 62464360
Fax:
Lonsdale,
Mark
Mimosa pigra - Australia
Organization:
CSIRO Division of Entomology
Address:
GPO Box 1700, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia
Phone:
+61 2 62464360
Fax:
Meyer,
Jean-Yves
Geographic region: Pacific, Indian Ocean
Ecosystem: Terrestrial
Expert in the botany of French Polynesia and the Pacific Islands, and has worked on ecology and biological control of Miconia calvescens in French Polynesia.
Organization:
D�l�gation � la Recherche
Address:
D�l�gation � la Recherche, Gouvernement de Polyn�sie fran�aise. B.P. 20981, 98713 Papeete, Tahiti, Polyn�sie fran�aise
Phone:
689 47 25 60
Fax:
Parkes,
John
Feral goats
Organization:
Manaaki Whenua - Landcare Research
Address:
P.O. Box 69, Lincoln, New Zealand
Phone:
Fax:
Paynter,
Quentin
Mimosa pigra - Australia
Organization:
CSIRO Entomology, Tropical Ecosystems Research Centre
Address:
PMB 44 Winnellie NT 0822, Australia
Phone:
+61 8 89448420
Fax:
+61 8 89448444
Paynter,
Quentin
Mimosa pigra - Australia
Organization:
CSIRO Entomology, Tropical Ecosystems Research Centre
Address:
PMB 44 Winnellie NT 0822, Australia
Phone:
+61 8 89448420
Fax:
+61 8 89448444
Szito,
Andras (Andy)
Stored product pests, including pest Trogoderma species, with particular interest in taxonomy and identification
Website
Organization:
Department of Agriculture Western Australia, Plant Research and Development Services
Address:
3 Baron-Hay Court, South Perth, WA 6151, Australia
Phone:
(+61 8) 9368 3248, 9368 3965
Fax:
(+61 8) 9368 3223, 9474 2840
Wilson,
Colin
Mimosa pigra, Chromolaena odorata - Australia and Indonesia
Organization:
Parks & Wildlife Commission of the Northern Territory
Address:
P.O. Box 496, Palmerston, NT 0831, Australia.
Phone:
+61 8 89994698
Fax:
+61 8 89994793
Wilson,
Colin
Mimosa pigra, Chromolaena odorata - Australia and Indonesia
Organization:
Parks & Wildlife Commission of the Northern Territory
Address:
P.O. Box 496, Palmerston, NT 0831, Australia.
Phone:
+61 8 89994698
Fax:
+61 8 89994793