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  • Felis catus on Chatham Island (Photo: Rex Williams, Chatham Island Taiko Trust)
  • Felis catus on Chatham Island, New Zealand (Photo: Rex Williams, Chatham Island Taiko Trust)
  • Felis catus on Chatham Island, New Zealand (Photo: Rex Williams, Chatham Island Taiko Trust)
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Common name
cat (English), domestic cat (English), pusiniveikau (English, Fiji), house cat (English), Hauskatze (German), poti (Maori), feral cat (English)
Synonym
Similar species
Summary
Felis catus was domesticated in the eastern Mediterranean c. 3000 years ago. Considering the extent to which cats are valued as pets, it is not surprising that they have since been translocated by humans to almost all parts of the world. Notable predators, cats threaten native birdlife and other fauna, especially on islands where native species have evolved in relative isolation from predators.
Species Description
Felis catus is a small animal in the wild (up to 5kg, but more commonly 1.5 -3.0kg) but may be considerably heavier when domesticated. Colour is extremely variable in domesticated varieties and feral cats commonly revert to black, tabby or tortoiseshell with varying extents of white starting from the belly and breast.
Lifecycle Stages
Gestation: 65 days. Weaning: 35-40 days. Sexual maturity: 9 months.
Habitat Description
Feral cats adapt to a variety of habitat types and circumstances. On the Australian continent they inhabit forests and woodland habitats in eastern, western and northern parts of the country (Dickman 1996). On Hahajima Island, Japan, feral cats have been observed widely in various kinds of habitats, including primary forests (Kawakami and Higuchi 2002). On Macquarie Island, (a sub-Antarctic Australian island) most cats live in herb-field or tussock grassland (Brothers Skira and Copson 1985), showing an ability to adapt to difficult terrain. A study of the habitat use and diet of feral cats in a Mediterranean habitat in a riparian reserve in central California (Hall et al. 2000, in Brickner 2003) can probably reflect on the situation in other areas with similar climatic areas. Cats in the reserve seemed to strongly prefer staying in riparian habitat. Hall and collegues (2000) suggest that this habitat provides ample cover and perhaps a variety of prey, especially birds. Cats in the study foraged mostly in the adjacent fields and annual grasslands and, to a lesser extent, in the riparian habitat (in Brickner 2003).
Reproduction
Domestic cats are intensive breeders, maybe due to the seasonal estrous cycle of the females, during which each female comes into heat several times until pregnancy or end of cycle (Gunther and Terkel 2002, in Brickner 2003). A female cat reaches reproductive maturity between 7 to 12 months of age can be in estrous as many as five times a year (Ogan and Jurek 1997, in Brickner 2003). The gestation period lasts 63 to 65 days (Nowak 1991, in Brickner 2003) and the average litter is four to six kittens (O’Donnell 2001, in Brickner 2003). Cats can reproduce any month of the year, where food and habitat is sufficient. An adult female may produce three litters per year (Fitzwater 1994, in Brickner 2003).
Nutrition
Male and female feral cat home ranges overlap (Say and Pontier 2004). The mean home range for feral cats in Hawaiian forests was 5.74km2 for males and 2.23km2 for females (Smucker et al. 2000). Australian studies have given mean home ranges of 7 to 28 hectares for domestic cats and up to 249.7 hectares for feral cats; while a New Zealand study posted home ranges of between 75 hectares and 985 hectares. Prey availability is a primary factor in determining home range size for feral cats (Edwards et al. 2001; Barratt 1997). Cat activity is bimodal, with peaks near dawn and dusk (Konecny 1987).
\r\n

The diet of feral cats on islands may vary significantly to that of feral cats on the mainland, with cats often taking advantage of alternative food sources. On the tiny 28 hectare Herekopare Island, New Zealand, for example, there are no introduced or native species of mammals. Prior to elimination of feral cats there in 1970, fairy prion (see Pachyptila turtur in IUCN Red List of Threatened Species) comprised the bulk of the diet with other sea birds and occasional land birds making up most of the remainder (Fitzgerald and Veitch 1985, in Dickman 1996). The weta (a native insect in the order Orthoptera) also appeared to be important to individual cats; two cats' stomachs were found to contain over 100 insects each. Similarly, in the Galapagos Islands, birds are an important component of the feral cat's diet, with cats sometimes taking birds of similar mass to themselves, such as frigate birds (Fregata spp.), pelicans (Pelecanus spp.) and flightless cormorants (Phalacrocorax spp.) (Konecny 1987, in Dickman 1996). On Aldabra Atoll, Seychelles, hatchlings of the green turtle (see Chelonia mydas in IUCN Red List of Threatened Species) are seasonally predominant in the diet of feral cats (Seabrook, 1989). On Christmas Island, the introduced black rat (Rattus rattus) comprises almost one third of the diet of feral cats by weight, however, 21% of the diet is comprised of the large flying-fox (see Pteropus melanotus in IUCN Red List of Threatened Species) and 28% of the imperial pigeon (see Ducula whartoni in IUCN Red List of Threatened Species) (Tidemann et al. 1994, in Dickman 1996).
\r\nClick here to see Major prey of feral cats in Australia (source: Dickman 1996).

Pathway
Many ships of the 18th and 19th centuries were infested with rats and so carried cats to control them.Taken by humans as pets then left behind or the young dispersed.

Principal source:

Compiler: IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG)
Updates with support from the Overseas Territories Environmental Programme (OTEP) project XOT603, a joint project with the Cayman Islands Government - Department of Environment

Review:

Publication date: 2010-09-15

Recommended citation: Global Invasive Species Database (2016) Species profile: Felis catus. Downloaded from http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=24 on 30-08-2016.

General Impacts
The most obvious impact of feral cats is the predatory impact they exert on native prey populations; this has resulted in the probable local or regional decline or extinction of many species (Dickman 1996). However, unambiguous evidence of cats causing a decline in a prey species is difficult to find as other factors, such as other predator species, may also be involved in the decline (Dickman 1996). One exception to this is a study by Saunders (1991) which showed that cats killed 7% of nestlings of red-tailed cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus magnificus) over 11 breeding seasons in Western Australia. Several reintroduction programmes in Australia have failed, due to the predation pressure exerted by feral cats, often in conjunction with foxes. For example, the success of the reintroductions of the golden bandicoot (Isoodon auratus) and the burrowing bettong (Bettongia lesueur) in the Gibson Desert, Western Australia was hindered primarily by feral cat predation. In general, the predatory impact of cats primarily affects birds and small to medium-sized mammals (Dickman 1996). Endangered species around the world are threatened by the presence of cats, including the black stilt (see Himantopus novaezelandiae in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species) (New Zealand), the Okinawa woodpecker (see Sapheopipo noguchii in IUCN Red List of Threatened Species) (Japan) and the Cayman Island ground iguana (see Cyclura lewisi in IUCN Red List of Threatened Species), to list just some of the many species effected.\r\n

Changes in island fauna after the introduction of cats can provide compelling evidence of their predatory impact. Cats have been introduced to 40 islands off the coast of Australia; seven off the coast of New Zealand and several dozen islands elsewhere in the Pacific (Dickman 1992a, Veitch 1985, King 1973 1984, in Dickman 1996). Feral cats have been implicated in the decline of at least six species of island endemic birds in New Zealand, including the Stephens Island wren, the sooty shearwater (Puffinus griseus) and the kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), as well as 70 local populations of insular birds (King 1984, in Dickman 1996). The elimination of cats often leads to an increase in the population size of prey species. For example, following removal of cats from Little Barrier Island, New Zealand, the stitchbird (Notiomystis cincta) increased from less than 500 individuals to 3000 individuals in just a few years (Griffin et al. 1988, in Dickman 1996).

Management Info
Cats were first domesticated in Egypt around 2000 BC (Serpell 1988, in Coleman et al. 1997, in Brickner 2003) and brought to Britain by 300AD by the Romans. European colonists introduced them around the globe (Coleman et al. 1997, in Brickner 2003). As cats are often revered as pets in our society this raises the moral dilemma of how to handle them when they have become a threat to native wildlife. Brickner (2003) suggests that animal rights organisations that condemn cat control via killing are over-looking the approximately 275 million animals killed by 9 million cats in Britain alone (Woods et al. in press). Obviously there are two quite different situations for management of the species, depending on the status of the cat: one is where a cat is a domesticated household pet and the other is when a cat has gone wild or feral and has no owner to protect and feed it.\r\n

When a cat is a pet, there are a number of ways in which to help prevent damage caused to wildlife. Brickner (2003) suggests keeping a cat in at night, fitting it with a bell, neutering the animal when it is young and giving it toys. However, the divided results of several investigations shows that the positive outcome of such actions is uncertain. Barrette (1998) found that fitting cats with bells has no significant effect on the amount of prey caught, whereas Ruxton et al. (2002) found that equipping cats with bells reduced prey delivery rates by about 50% (in Brickner 2003). Woods, McDonald and Harris (2003) found that the number of birds and herpetofauna brought home by cats was significantly lower in households that feed birds (but the number of actual different types of bird species killed was greater in households that feed birds). The number of mammals brought home per cat was lower when cats were equipped with bells or kept indoors at night, however, the number of herpetofauna brought home was greater when cats were kept in at night. The outcome of this is that there appears to be a subjective choice to be made as to whether it is more important to protect herpetofauna or mammals. Obviously, if the mammals being caught are introduced species, such as rats and mice, this raises another dilemma. \r\n

In the second situation, when a cat is feral and threatening wildlife, a more severe means of controlling cats appears justified. In 1992 the Australian Parliament passed the Endangered Species Protection Act 1992, which obligates the commonwealth to provide a Threat Abatement Plan (TAP) for each listed threatening process, including one for feral cats (Brickner 2003). The key objectives of the feral cat TAP are: eradicate feral cats from islands where they threaten vulnerable native animals; prevent feral cats from occupying new islands where they may be a threat to native communities; promote the recovery of species threatened by feral cats; improve the effectiveness and humaneness of cat control methods and improve the understanding of the impacts of feral cats on native animals. The use of visual lures (such as feathers and cotton wool) and attractants (such as tuna oil) are currently being tested in an effort to attract greater numbers of feral cats to traps and baits. The impact of feral cats on native wildlife is being studied in various parts of Australia in order to have it quantified (Brickner 2003).

Predation by feral cats was listed as a Key Threatening Process under the Federal Endangered Species Protection Act 1992. A Threat Abatement Plan for Predation by Feral Cats was produced in 1999 and amended in 2008 to promote the recovery of vulnerable and endangered native species and threatened ecological communities (Environment Australia 1999 and DEWHA 2008). A recently published review (Denny and Dickman (2010) assesses the efficacy of the methods used to estimate relative abundance of cats; describes currently used cat control methodologies; and discusses possible future directions for the control of cats in Australia. It also includes details of the current legislative framework that exists for cat control in Australia; describes the ecology of feral and stray cats exploiting various habitats. Please follow this link to view Denny E. A & C. R. Dickman 2010. Review of cat ecology and management strategies in Australia

Countries (or multi-country features) with distribution records for Felis catus
Informations on Felis catus has been recorded for the following locations. Click on the name for additional informations.
Lorem Ipsum
Location Status Invasiveness Occurrence Source
Details of Felis catus in information
Status
Invasiveness
Arrival date
Occurrence
Source
Introduction
Species notes for this location
Location note
Management notes for this location
Impact
Mechanism:
Outcome:
Ecosystem services:
Impact information
The most obvious impact of feral cats is the predatory impact they exert on native prey populations; this has resulted in the probable local or regional decline or extinction of many species (Dickman 1996). However, unambiguous evidence of cats causing a decline in a prey species is difficult to find as other factors, such as other predator species, may also be involved in the decline (Dickman 1996). One exception to this is a study by Saunders (1991) which showed that cats killed 7% of nestlings of red-tailed cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus magnificus) over 11 breeding seasons in Western Australia. Several reintroduction programmes in Australia have failed, due to the predation pressure exerted by feral cats, often in conjunction with foxes. For example, the success of the reintroductions of the golden bandicoot (Isoodon auratus) and the burrowing bettong (Bettongia lesueur) in the Gibson Desert, Western Australia was hindered primarily by feral cat predation. In general, the predatory impact of cats primarily affects birds and small to medium-sized mammals (Dickman 1996). Endangered species around the world are threatened by the presence of cats, including the black stilt (see Himantopus novaezelandiae in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species) (New Zealand), the Okinawa woodpecker (see Sapheopipo noguchii in IUCN Red List of Threatened Species) (Japan) and the Cayman Island ground iguana (see Cyclura lewisi in IUCN Red List of Threatened Species), to list just some of the many species effected.\r\n

Changes in island fauna after the introduction of cats can provide compelling evidence of their predatory impact. Cats have been introduced to 40 islands off the coast of Australia; seven off the coast of New Zealand and several dozen islands elsewhere in the Pacific (Dickman 1992a, Veitch 1985, King 1973 1984, in Dickman 1996). Feral cats have been implicated in the decline of at least six species of island endemic birds in New Zealand, including the Stephens Island wren, the sooty shearwater (Puffinus griseus) and the kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), as well as 70 local populations of insular birds (King 1984, in Dickman 1996). The elimination of cats often leads to an increase in the population size of prey species. For example, following removal of cats from Little Barrier Island, New Zealand, the stitchbird (Notiomystis cincta) increased from less than 500 individuals to 3000 individuals in just a few years (Griffin et al. 1988, in Dickman 1996).

Red List assessed species 587: EX = 44; EW = 3; CR = 104; EN = 135; VU = 132; NT = 82; DD = 16; LC = 71;
View more species View less species
Outcomes
[42] Environmental Ecosystem - Habitat
  • [42] Reduction in native biodiversity
[7] Environmental Species - Population
  • [7] Population size decline
Management information
Cats were first domesticated in Egypt around 2000 BC (Serpell 1988, in Coleman et al. 1997, in Brickner 2003) and brought to Britain by 300AD by the Romans. European colonists introduced them around the globe (Coleman et al. 1997, in Brickner 2003). As cats are often revered as pets in our society this raises the moral dilemma of how to handle them when they have become a threat to native wildlife. Brickner (2003) suggests that animal rights organisations that condemn cat control via killing are over-looking the approximately 275 million animals killed by 9 million cats in Britain alone (Woods et al. in press). Obviously there are two quite different situations for management of the species, depending on the status of the cat: one is where a cat is a domesticated household pet and the other is when a cat has gone wild or feral and has no owner to protect and feed it.\r\n

When a cat is a pet, there are a number of ways in which to help prevent damage caused to wildlife. Brickner (2003) suggests keeping a cat in at night, fitting it with a bell, neutering the animal when it is young and giving it toys. However, the divided results of several investigations shows that the positive outcome of such actions is uncertain. Barrette (1998) found that fitting cats with bells has no significant effect on the amount of prey caught, whereas Ruxton et al. (2002) found that equipping cats with bells reduced prey delivery rates by about 50% (in Brickner 2003). Woods, McDonald and Harris (2003) found that the number of birds and herpetofauna brought home by cats was significantly lower in households that feed birds (but the number of actual different types of bird species killed was greater in households that feed birds). The number of mammals brought home per cat was lower when cats were equipped with bells or kept indoors at night, however, the number of herpetofauna brought home was greater when cats were kept in at night. The outcome of this is that there appears to be a subjective choice to be made as to whether it is more important to protect herpetofauna or mammals. Obviously, if the mammals being caught are introduced species, such as rats and mice, this raises another dilemma. \r\n

In the second situation, when a cat is feral and threatening wildlife, a more severe means of controlling cats appears justified. In 1992 the Australian Parliament passed the Endangered Species Protection Act 1992, which obligates the commonwealth to provide a Threat Abatement Plan (TAP) for each listed threatening process, including one for feral cats (Brickner 2003). The key objectives of the feral cat TAP are: eradicate feral cats from islands where they threaten vulnerable native animals; prevent feral cats from occupying new islands where they may be a threat to native communities; promote the recovery of species threatened by feral cats; improve the effectiveness and humaneness of cat control methods and improve the understanding of the impacts of feral cats on native animals. The use of visual lures (such as feathers and cotton wool) and attractants (such as tuna oil) are currently being tested in an effort to attract greater numbers of feral cats to traps and baits. The impact of feral cats on native wildlife is being studied in various parts of Australia in order to have it quantified (Brickner 2003).

Predation by feral cats was listed as a Key Threatening Process under the Federal Endangered Species Protection Act 1992. A Threat Abatement Plan for Predation by Feral Cats was produced in 1999 and amended in 2008 to promote the recovery of vulnerable and endangered native species and threatened ecological communities (Environment Australia 1999 and DEWHA 2008). A recently published review (Denny and Dickman (2010) assesses the efficacy of the methods used to estimate relative abundance of cats; describes currently used cat control methodologies; and discusses possible future directions for the control of cats in Australia. It also includes details of the current legislative framework that exists for cat control in Australia; describes the ecology of feral and stray cats exploiting various habitats. Please follow this link to view Denny E. A & C. R. Dickman 2010. Review of cat ecology and management strategies in Australia

Locations
ANGUILLA
AUSTRALIA
BAHAMAS
BERMUDA
BRITISH INDIAN OCEAN TERRITORY
CAYMAN ISLANDS
ECUADOR
FALKLAND ISLANDS (MALVINAS)
FIJI
FRENCH SOUTHERN TERRITORIES
ISRAEL
JAPAN
KIRIBATI
MAURITIUS
MEXICO
NEW CALEDONIA
NEW ZEALAND
NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS
PALAU
SAINT HELENA
SEYCHELLES
SOUTH AFRICA
SPAIN
TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
UNITED KINGDOM
UNITED STATES
UNITED STATES MINOR OUTLYING ISLANDS
Management Category
Prevention
Eradication
Control
None
Unknown
Monitoring
Bibliography
132 references found for Felis catus

Managment information
Alterio, N., Moller, H. and Ratz, H. 1998. Movements and habitat use of feral house cats Felis catus, Stoats Mustela erminea and ferrets Mustela furo, in grassland surrounding yellow-eyed penguin Megadyptes antipodes breeding areas in spring, Biological Conservation 83(2): 187-194.
Atkinson, I. A. E. and Atkinson, T. J. 2000. Land vertebrates as invasive species on islands served by the South Pacific Regional Environment Programme. In: Invasive Species in the Pacific: A Technical Review and Draft Regional Strategy. South Pacific Regional Environment Programme, Samoa: 19-84.
Summary: This report reviews available information on the adverse effects of 14 alien vertebrates considered to be �significant invasive species on islands of the South Pacific and Hawaii, supplementing the authors� experience with that of other workers.
Baker-Gabb D. 2004. National Recovery Plan for the Norfolk Island Scarlet Robin Petroica multicolor multicolor and the Norfolk Island Golden Whistler Pachycephala pectoralis xanthroprocta. Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra.
Barratt, D.G. 1997. Home range size, habitat utilisation and movement patterns of suburban and farm cats Felis catus. Ecography. 20: 271-280.
Barratt, D.G. 1997. Predation by House Cats, Felis catus (L.), in Canberra, Australia. I. Prey composition and preference. Wildlife Research. 24 (3): 263-277.
Summary: This paper presents the results of a study into the prey composition for house cats in Canberra, Australia.
Bomford, M., 2003. Risk Assessment for the Import and Keeping of Exotic Vertebrates in Australia. Bureau of Rural Sciences, Canberra.
Summary: Available from: http://www.feral.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/PC12803.pdf [Accessed August 19 2010]
Brickner, I. 2003. The impact of domestic cat (Felis catus) on wildlife welfare and conservation: a literature review. With a situation summary from Israel.
Summary: Available from: http://www.tau.ac.il/lifesci/zoology/members/yom-tov/inbal/cats.pdf [Accessed 16 May 2006]
Burbidge, A.A., 2004. Montebello Renewal: Western Shield review�February 2003. Conservation Science Western Australia 5(2), 194-201.
Castillo, D. and Clarke, A.L. 2003. Trap/neuter/release methods ineffective in controlling domestic cat colonies on public lands. Natural Areas Journal. 23 (3): 247-253.
Summary: This paper looks at the effectiveness of the trap/neuter/release methods used to control domestic cat colonies in the USA.
Clarke, A.L. and Pacin, T. 2002. Domestic cat colonies in natural areas: A growing exotic species threat. Natural Areas Journal. 22 (2): 154-159.
Summary: This paper considers the problem of domestic cat populations in natural areas in the USA.
Clout, M.N. and J.C. Russell, 2006. The eradication of mammals from New Zealand islands Pages 127-141. In Koike, F., Clout, M.N., Kawamichi, M., De Poorter, M. and Iwatsuki, K. (eds.), Assessment and Control of Biological Invasion Risks. Shoukadoh Book Sellers, Kyoto, Japan and the World Conservation Union (IUCN), Gland, Switzerland, 2006.
Cooper, J., Marais, A. V. N., Bloomer, J. P. and Bester, M. N. 1995. A success story: Breeding of Burrowing petrels (Procellaridae) before and after the eradication of feral cats Felis catus at subantartic Marion Island. Marine Ornithology 23: 33-37.
Daniels, M.J., Beaumont, M.A., Johnson, P.J., Balharry, D., Macdonald, D.W. and Barratt, E. 2001. Ecology and genetics of wild-living cats in the north-east of Scotland and the implications for the conservation of the wildcat. Journal of Applied Ecology. 38 (1): 146-161.
Summary: This paper discusses the interaction between wildcats and domestic cats in Scotland, and suggests management measures.
Denny E. A and Dickman C. R, 2010. Review of Cat Ecology and Management Strategies in Australia, Invasive Animals Cooperative Research Centre, Canberra.
Summary: Available from: http://www.feral.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/CatReport_web.pdf [Accessed 21 June 2010]
Dickman, C. R. 1996. Overview of the impacts of feral cats on Australian native fauna. Canberra: Australian Nature Conservation Agency.
Domm, S. and Messersmith, J. 1990. Feral cat eradication on a Barrier reef island, Australia. National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution: Washington.
Summary: Overview of cat eradication from North West Island.
Available from: http://www.botany.hawaii.edu/faculty/duffy/arb/330-338/338.pdf [Accessed 16 May 2006]
Duffy, D. C., and Capece, P., 2012. Biology and Impacts of Pacific Island Invasive Species. 7. The Domestic Cat (Felis catus) Pacific Science 66(2):173-212. 2012
Edwards, G.P., De Preu, N., Shakeshaft, B.J., Crealy, I.V. and Paltridge, R.M. 2001. Home range and movements of male feral cats (Felis catus) in a semiarid woodland environment in central Australia. Austral Ecology. 26 (1): 93.
Galapagos Invasive Species: Harmful animals, 2004. Farewell to the airport cats: Eradication of feral cats from Baltra island.
Summary: Available from: http://www.hear.org/galapagos/invasives/topics/management/vertebrates/projects/cats.htm [Accessed 15 February 2005]
Genovesi, P. 2005. Eradications of invasive alien species in Europe: a review. Biological Invasions. 7 (1): 127-133.
Summary: This paper gives details of the eradications of introduced species in Europe, including the eradication of M. vison from Hiimaa Island in Estonia.
Girardet, S. A. B., Veitch, C. R., Craig, J. L. 2001. Bird and rat numbers on Little Barrier Island, New Zealand, over the period of cat eradication 1976-80. New Zealand Journal of Zoology 28: 13-29.
IUCN 2010. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.4.
Summary: The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species provides taxonomic, conservation status and distribution information on taxa that have been globally evaluated using the IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria. This system is designed to determine the relative risk of extinction, and the main purpose of the IUCN Red List is to catalogue and highlight those taxa that are facing a higher risk of global extinction (i.e. those listed as Critically Endangered, Endangered and Vulnerable). The IUCN Red List also includes information on taxa that are categorized as Extinct or Extinct in the Wild; on taxa that cannot be evaluated because of insufficient information (i.e. are Data Deficient); and on taxa that are either close to meeting the threatened thresholds or that would be threatened were it not for an ongoing taxon-specific conservation programme (i.e. are Near Threatened).
Available from: http://www.iucnredlist.org/ [Accessed 25 May 2011]
IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG)., 2010. A Compilation of Information Sources for Conservation Managers.
Summary: This compilation of information sources can be sorted on keywords for example: Baits & Lures, Non Target Species, Eradication, Monitoring, Risk Assessment, Weeds, Herbicides etc. This compilation is at present in Excel format, this will be web-enabled as a searchable database shortly. This version of the database has been developed by the IUCN SSC ISSG as part of an Overseas Territories Environmental Programme funded project XOT603 in partnership with the Cayman Islands Government - Department of Environment. The compilation is a work under progress, the ISSG will manage, maintain and enhance the database with current and newly published information, reports, journal articles etc.
Konecny, M.J. 1987. Home range and activity patterns of feral house cats in the Galapagos Islands. Oikos. 50 (1): 17-23.
Nogales, M.; A. Martin, B. Tershy, C.J Donlan, D. Veitch, N. Puerta, B. Wood and J. Alonso., 2004. A Review of Feral Cat Eradication on Islands.
Summary: A review of feral cat eradication programmes on islands.
Pacific Invasives Initiative (PII), 2006a. Viwa Island Restoration Project
Summary: Available from: http://www.issg.org/cii/PII/demo/viwa.html [Accessed 12 March 2010]
Pacific Invasives Initiative (PII), 2006. Eradicating invasive species from Kayangel Atoll, Palau
Summary: Available from: http://www.issg.org/cii/PII/demo/kayangel.html [Accessed 12 March 2010]
Pacific Invasives Initiative (PII), 2006. Phoenix Islands Conservation Survey, Kiribati.
Summary: Available from: http://www.issg.org/cii/PII/demo/phoenix.html [Accessed 12 March 2010]
Phillips, R. B., Cooke, B. D., Campbell, K., Carrion, V., Marquez, C., and Snell, H. L.. 2005. Eradicating feral cats to protect Galapagos Land Iguanas: methods and strategies. Pacific Conservation Biology 11:257-267.
Rauzon, M. J. 1982. Feral cat eradication on Jarvis Island. Bulletin of the Pacific Seabird Group 9: 75.
Rauzon, M. J. 1985. Feral cats on Jarvis Island; their effects and their eradication. Atoll Research Bulletin 282�292 (282). 32pp.
Tasman District Council (TDC) 2001. Tasman-Nelson Regional Pest Management Strategy
The Red List of Terrestrial Mammalian Species of the Abu Dhabi Emirate. 2005. Terrestrial Environment Research Centre (Environmental Research and Wildlife Development Agency)
Summary: Available from: http://www.ead.ae/TacSoft/FileManager/Publications/reports/TERC/AD_mammals_RedDataList.0.5.pdf [Accessed 16 May 2006]
Twyford, K. L., Humphrey, P. G., Nunn, R. P. and Willoughby, L. 2000. Eradication of feral cats (Felis catus) from Gabo Island, southeast Victoria. Ecological Management 1: 42-49.
Varnham, K. 2006. Non-native species in UK Overseas Territories: a review. JNCC Report 372. Peterborough: United Kingdom.
Summary: This database compiles information on alien species from British Overseas Territories.
Available from: http://www.jncc.gov.uk/page-3660 [Accessed 10 November 2009]
Veitch, C. R. 1985. Methods of eradicating feral cats from offshore islands in New Zealand. In Moors, P. J. (ed.) Conservation of island birds. International Council for Bird Preservation Technical Publication No. 3, Cambridge.
Veitch, C. R. 2001. The eradication of feral cats (Felis catus) from Little Barrier Island, New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Zoology 28: 1-12.
Woods, M., McDonald, R.A. and Harris, S. 2003. Predation of wildlife by domestic cats Felis catus in Great Britain. Mammal Review. 33 (2): 174-188.
Summary: This paper examines the impact of predation by domestic cats on wildlife in Great Britain.
General information
Abbott, I. 2002. Origin and spread of the cat, Felis catus, on mainland Australia, with a discussion of the magnitude of its early impact on native fauna. Wildlife Research. 29 (1): 51-74.
Summary: This article discusses the spread of the cat throughout mainland Australia and the early impact on native fauna.
Ainley, D., Podolsky,R., Deforest, L., Spencer, G. and Nur, N. 2001. The status and population trends of the Newell s Shearwater on Kaua i: Insights from modelling. Studies in Avian Biology. 22: 108-123.
Summary: This study reports on the impacts of predators on the endangered Newell s shearwater on Kaua I, Hawaii.
Apps, P.J. 1986. Home ranges of feral cats on Dassen Island. Journal of Mammalogy. 67 (1): 199-200.
Summary: This short note discusses the diet and home range of feral cats on Dassen Island, South Africa.
Baker, P.J., Bentley, A.J., Ansell, R.J. and Harris, S. 2005. Impact of predation by domestic cats Felis catus in an urban area. Mammal Review. 35 (3-4): 302.
Summary: This paper examines the impact of cat predation in an urban area (Bristol, UK).
BirdLife International 2006. Pterodroma sandwichensis. In: IUCN 2006. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species
Summary: Available from: http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/144845/0 [Accessed 12 March 2010]
BirdLife International 2008. Nestor notabilis. In: IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2011.2
Summary: Available from: http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/106001410/0 [Accessed 16 December 2012]
BirdLife International 2008. Polytelis alexandrae. In: IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2011.2
Summary: Available from: http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/106001458/0 [Accessed 16 Januray 2012)
BirdLife International 2009. Pezoporus occidentalis. In: IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2011.2.
Summary: Available from: http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/106001491/0 [Accessed 16 Januray 2012)
BirdLife International 2010. Puffinus mauretanicus. In: IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2011.2.
Summary: Available from: http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/160030026/0 [Accessed 16 December 2012]
Bloomer, J. P. and Bester, M. N. 1992. Control of feral cats on subantarctic Marion Island, Indian Ocean. Biological Conservation 60: 211�219.
Brito, D., Oliveira, L.C. and Mello, M.A.R. 2004. An overview of mammalian conservation at Poco das Antas Biological Reserve, southeastern Brazil. Journal for Nature Conservation. 12 (4): 219-228.
Summary: This article looks at the impacts of feral cats in the Poco das Antas Biological Reserve in Brazil.
Brockman, Diane K., Laurie R. Godfrey, Luke J. Dollar and Joelisoa Ratsirarson, 2008. Evidence of Invasive Felis silvestris Predation on Propithecus verreauxi at Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar. International Journal of Primatology
Chapuis, J., Bouss�s, P., & Barnaud, G. 1994. Alien mammals, impact and management in the French Subantartic Islands. Biological Conservation, 67, 97-104.
Summary: Cet article pr�sente la situation actuelle et les impacts des populations introduites de mammif�res dans les �les subantarctiques fran�aises. Les moyens de contr�le en place ou planifi�s sont �galement pr�sent�s.
Churcher, P.B. and Lawton, J.H. 1987. Predation by domestic cats in an English village. Journal of Zoology. 212 (3): 439-455.
Summary: This study looked at the impact of cat predation on a house sparrow population in a typical English village.
CONABIO. 2008. Sistema de informaci�n sobre especies invasoras en M�xico. Especies invasoras - Mam�feros. Comisi�n Nacional para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad. Fecha de acceso.
Summary: English:
The species list sheet for the Mexican information system on invasive species currently provides information related to Scientific names, family, group and common names, as well as habitat, status of invasion in Mexico, pathways of introduction and links to other specialised websites. Some of the higher risk species already have a direct link to the alert page. It is important to notice that these lists are constantly being updated, please refer to the main page (http://www.conabio.gob.mx/invasoras/index.php/Portada), under the section Novedades for information on updates.
Invasive species - mammals is available from: http://www.conabio.gob.mx/invasoras/index.php/Especies_invasoras_-_Mam%C3%ADferos [Accessed 30 July 2008]
Spanish:
La lista de especies del Sistema de informaci�n sobre especies invasoras de m�xico cuenta actualmente con informaci�n aceca de nombre cient�fico, familia, grupo y nombre com�n, as� como h�bitat, estado de la invasi�n en M�xico, rutas de introducci�n y ligas a otros sitios especializados. Algunas de las especies de mayor riesgo ya tienen una liga directa a la p�gina de alertas. Es importante resaltar que estas listas se encuentran en constante proceso de actualizaci�n, por favor consulte la portada (http://www.conabio.gob.mx/invasoras/index.php/Portada), en la secci�n novedades, para conocer los cambios.
Especies invasoras - Mam�feros is available from: http://www.conabio.gob.mx/invasoras/index.php/Especies_invasoras_-_Mam%C3%ADferos [Accessed 30 July 2008]
Cuthbert, R. 2003. Sign left by introduced and native predators feeding on Hutton s shearwaters Puffinus huttoni. New Zealand Journal of Zoology. 30 (3): 163-170.
Summary: This paper looks at the range of predators which feed on the endangered Hutton s shearwater in New Zealand.
Dexter, N., Dowler, R.C., Flanagan, J.P., Hart, S., Revelez, M.A. and Lee. T.E. Jr. 2004. The influence of feral cats Felis catus on the distribution and abundance of introduced and endemic Galapagos rodents. Pacific Conservation Biology. 10 (4): 210-215.
Summary: This article looks at the differences in the impacts of feral cats on introduced and endemic rodents in the Galapagos Islands.
Dickman, C.R. 1996. Overview of the Impact of Feral Cats on Australian Native Fauna. Department of the Environment and Heritage, The Australian Government.
Summary: Comprehensive overview of features of feral cats in Australia and their impact on native species.
Dilks, P.J. 1979. Observations on the food of feral cats on Campbell Island. New Zealand Journal of Ecology. 2: 64-66.
Summary: This short paper looks at the history and diet of cats on Campbell Island, New Zealand.
Dutton, J. 1994. Introduced mammals in Sao Tome and Principe: possible threats to biodiversity. Biodiversity and Conservation. 3: 927-938.
Summary: This paper outlines the history of mammal introductions to Sao Tome and Principe.
Duvall II, F.P. 2001. Feral Cat (Felis cattus) Predation on Low Elevation Native Seabird Colonies on Maui Island (abstract), Society for Conservation Biology.
Summary: Available from: http://www.conbio.org/Activities/Meetings/2001/abstracts.cfm [Accessed 16 May 2006]
Faulquier, L. 2005. Evaluation de l�impact des chats harets Felis catus sur les populations d�oiseaux marins de deux �les tropicales (La R�union et Juan de Nova) et propositions de mesures de gestion. Rapport de stage, Master SET, Universit� Paul C�zanne et Laboratoire ECOMAR Universit� de la R�union. 36pp
Fitzgerald, B. M. 1988. Diet of domestic cats and their impact on prey populations. pp. 123-147 in Turner, D.C. and Bateson, P. (eds.), The domestic cat: the biology of its behaviour. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K. 222 pp.
Fitzgerald, B. M. 1990. House cat. In King, C. M. (ed.) The Handbook of New Zealand mammals. Oxford University Press, Auckland. pp. 330-348
Fitzgerald, B. M. and Karl, B. J. 1986. Home range of feral cats (Felis catus L.) in forest of the Orongorongo Valley, Wellington, New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Ecology 9: 71�81.
Fitzgerald, B. M. and Turner, D. C. 2000. Hunting behaviour of domestic cats and their impact on prey populations. pp. 151-175 in Turner, D.C. and Bateson, P. (eds.), The domestic cat: the biology of its behaviour. Second Edition. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K. 244 pp.
Fitzgerald, B. M. and Veitch, C. R. 1985. The cats of Herekopare Island, New Zealand; their history, ecology and effects on wildlife. New Zealand Journal of Zoology 12: 319�330.
Gargominy, O. (Ed.). 2003. Biodiversit� et conservation dans les collectivit�s fran�aises d outre-mer. Comit� fran�ais pour l UICN, Paris.
Summary: Synth�se sur la biodiversit� des �les fran�aises d outre-mer et les enjeux de conservation.
Available from: http://www.uicn.fr/Biodiversite-outre-mer-2003.html [Accessed 26 March 2008]
Gerber, G. and Iverson, J. Undated. Turks and Caicos iguana (Cyclura carinata carinata). The World Conservation Union (IUCN): Iguana Specialist Group.
Summary: Overview of Turks and Caicos iguana status on Turks and Caicos Island.
Available from: http://www.iucn-isg.org/actionplan/ch2/tciguana.php [Accessed 16 May 2006]
Gillies, C. 2001. Advances in New Zealand mammalogy 1990 - 2000: House cat. Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand 31: 205-218.
Gillies, C.A., Leach, M.R., Coad, N.B., Theobald, S.W., Campbell, J., Herbert, T., Graham, P.J. and Pierce, R.J. 2003. Six years of intensive pest mammals control at Trounson Kauri Park, a Department of Conservation mainland island , June 1996-July 2002. New Zealand Journal of Zoology. 30 (4): 399-420.
Summary: This paper describes the pest management strategies which were undertaken at Trounson Kauri Park, New Zealand.
Harper, G.A. 2005. Numerical and functional response of feral cats (Felis catus) to variations in abundance of primary prey on Stewart Island (Rakiura), New Zealand. Wildlife Research. 32: 597-604.
Summary: This paper examines the relationship between feral cats on Stewart Island and rats, their primary food source.
Hawkins, A.F.A. 2008a. Fossa fossana. In: IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2011.2.
Summary: Available from: http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/8668/0 [Accessed 1 February 2012]
Hawkins, A.F.A. 2008c. Galidictis fasciata. In: IUCN 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2011.2.
Summary: Available from: http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/8833/0 [Accessed 1 February 2012]
Hodges, C.S.N. and Nagata, R.J. Sr. 2001. Effects of predator control on the survival and breeding success of the endangered Hawaiian Dark-rumped Petrel. Studies in Avian Biology. 22: 308-318.
Summary: This study reports on the impacts of predator control on the population of the Hawaiian petrel.
Hu, D., Glidden, C., Lippert, J.S., Schnell, L., MacIvor, J.S. and Meisler, J. 2001. Habitat use and limiting factors in a population of Hawaiian Dark-rumped petrels on Mauna Loa, Hawaii. Studies in Avian Biology. 22: 234-242.
Summary: This study reports on the factors which are contributing to the endangered status of the Hawaiian dark-rumped petrel on Mauna Loa, Hawaii.
Imber, M. J. 1975. Petrels and predators. International Council for Bird Preservation Bulletin 12: 260�263.
ITIS (Integrated Taxonomic Information System), 2005. Online Database Felis catus
Summary: An online database that provides taxonomic information, common names, synonyms and geographical jurisdiction of a species. In addition links are provided to retrieve biological records and collection information from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) Data Portal and bioscience articles from BioOne journals.
Available from: http://www.cbif.gc.ca/pls/itisca/taxastep?king=every&p_action=containing&taxa=Felis+catus&p_format=&p_ifx=plglt&p_lang= [Accessed March 2005]
Jogahara, T., Ogura, G., Sasaki, T., Takehara, K. and Kawashima, Y. 2003. Food habits of cats (Felis catus) in forests and villages and their impacts on native animals in the Yambaru Area, northern part of Okinawa Island, Japan. Honyurui Kagaku. 43 (1): 29-37.
Summary: This paper looks at the diet and impacts of feral cats on native animals on Okinawa Island, Japan.
Jones, E. 1977. Ecology of the feral cat, Felis catus (L.), (Carnivora: Felidae) on Macquarie Island. Australian Wildlife Research. 4 (3): 249-262.
Summary: This paper discusses the ecology of the feral cat on Macquarie Island.
Kawakami, K. and Fujita, M. 2004. Feral cat predation on seabirds on Hahajima, the Bonin Islands, Southern Japan. Ornithological Science. 3: 155-158.
Summary: This paper looks at the impacts feral cats are having on the seabird population of the Bonin Islands, Japan.
Kawakami, K. and Higuchi, H. 2002. Bird predation by domestic cats on Hahajima Island, Bonin Islands, Japan, Ornithological Science 1: 143 - 144.
Summary: Description of various bird wildlife impacted by a domestic cat on Hahajima Island, Bonin Islands (Japan).
Available from: http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/osj/1/2/1_143/_article [Accessed 16 May 2006]
Keedwell, R.J. 2003. Does fledging equal success? Post-fledgling mortality in the Black-fronted tern. Journal of Field Ornithology. 74 (3): 217-221.
Summary: This paper looks at the causes of fledgling mortality in the endangered black-fronted tern in New Zealand.
Keitt, B.S. and Tershy, B.R. 2003. Cat eradication significantly decreases shearwater mortality. Animal Conservation. 6: 307-308.
Summary: This paper reports on the changes in shearwater mortality on Natividad Island, Mexico, following cat eradication.
Kerbiriou, C. and Le Viol, I. 1999. Predation of storm petrels Hydrobates pelagicus by domestic cats in the islands of Molene, Ledenez Vraz and Ledenez Vihan (Molene Archipelago, west Brittany). Alauda. 67 (2): 119-122.
Summary: This article reports on the predation by cats on storm petrels in the Molene Archipelago, France.
Kirkpatrick, R. D. and Rauzon, M. J. 1986. Foods of feral cats Felis catus on Jarvis and Howland Islands, central Pacific Ocean. Biotropica 18(1): 72�75.
Laut, M.E., Banko, P.C. and Gray, E.M. 2003. Nesting behavior of Palila, as assessed from video recordings. Pacific Science. 57 (4): 385-392.
Summary: This paper presents the findings of video recordings of the nests of the endangered palila, in Hawaii.
McChesney, G.J. and Tershy, B.R. 1998. History and status of introduced mammals and impacts to breeding seabirds on the California Channel and Northwestern Baja California Islands. Colonial Waterbirds. 21 (3): 335-347.
Summary: This paper examines the impacts of introduced mammals such as feral cats on breeding seabird populations in the California Channel Islands and the Northwestern Baja California Islands.
McOrist, S. and Kitchener, A.C. 1994. Current threats to the European wildcat, Felis silvestris, in Scotland. Ambio. 23 (4-5): 4-5.
Summary: The authors outline the threats to the European wildcat in Scotland, including hybridisation with domestic cats.
Mus�um national d Histoire naturelle [Ed]. 2003-2006 . Felis catus. Inventaire national du Patrimoine naturel, site Web : http://inpn.mnhn.fr. Document t�l�charg� le 28 mars 2008 .
Summary: Available from: http://inpn.mnhn.fr/isb/servlet/ISBServlet?action=Espece&typeAction=10&pageReturn=ficheEspeceDescription.jsp&numero_taxon=60595 [Accessed March 21 2008]
Norbury, G. 2001. Conserving dryland lizards by reducing predator-mediated apparent competition and direct competition with introduced rabbits. Journal of Applied Ecology 38: 1350-1361.
Palmer, S. August 14, 2004. Salmonella outbreak forces county to destroy feral cats. The Register-Guard
Summary: This newspaper article reports on an outbreak of salmonella among feral cats in Oregon, USA.
Paltridge, R., Gibson, D. and Edwards, G. 1997. Diet of the feral cat (Felis catus) in Central Australia. Wildlife Research. 24 (1): 67-76.
Summary: This paper discusses the diet of feral cats in central Australia.
Pascal, M. 1980. Structure et dynamique de la population de Chats harets de l archipel des Kerguelen. Mammalia, 42, 161-182.
Pascal, M., Barr�, N., De Garine-Wichatitsky, Lorvelec, O., Fr�tey, T., Brescia, F., Jourdan, H. 2006. Les peuplements n�o-cal�doniens de vert�b�br�s : invasions, disparitions. Pp 111-162, in M.-L. Beauvais et al., : Les esp�ces envahissantes dans l�archipel n�o-cal�donien, Paris, IRD �ditions, 260 p.+ c�d�rom
Summary: Synth�se des introductions d esp�ces de vert�br�s en Nouvelle-Cal�donie et �valuation de leurs impacts.
Pei, J-C. 2004. Present status of larger mammals in Kenting National Park and their conservation concerns. Taiwan Journal of Forest Science. 19 (3): 199-214.
Summary: This paper describes the status of large mammals in Kenting National Park, Taiwan.
Phillips, R. B., Winchell, C. S., Schmidt, R. H. 2007. Dietary overlap of an alien and native carnivore on San Clemente Island, California. Journal of Mammalogy 88:173-180.
Pierpaoli, M., Biro, Z.S., Herrmann, M., Hupe, K., Fernandes, M., Ragni, B., Szemethy, L. and Randi, E. 2003. Genetic distinction of wildcat (Felis silvestris) populations in Europe, and hybridisation with domestic cats in Hungary. Molecular Ecology. 12: 2585-2598.
Summary: This paper examines the genetic relationship and degree of hybridisation between feral cats and wildcats in Europe.
Pimentel, D., McNair, S., Janecka, J., Wightman, J., Simmonds, C., O�Connell, C., Wong, E., Russel, L., Zern, J., Aquino, T., Tsomondo, T. 2001. Economic and Environmental Threats of Alien Plant, Animal, and Microbe Invasions, Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 84: 1 - 20.
Summary: Economic impacts of invasive species, including brief mention of cat predation.
Available from: http://siteresources.worldbank.org/EXTABOUTUS/Resources/gss-economic-environ-threats-ias.pdf [Accessed 16 May 2006]
Pontier, D., Say, L., Debias, F., Bried, J., Thioulouse, J., Micol, T. and Natoli, E. 2002. The diet of feral cats (Felis catus L.) at five sites on the Grande Terre, Kerguelen archipelago. Polar Biology. 25 (11): 833-837.
Summary: The authors report on a study of the diet of feral cats on Grande Terre, Kerguelen Archipelago, in the French Southern Territories.
Putaala, A., Turtola, A. and Hissa, R. 2001. Mortality of wild and released hand-reared grey partridges (Perdix perdix) in Finland. Game and Wildlife Science. 18 (3-4): 291-304.
Summary: This paper examines the causes for mortality of wild and released grey partridges in Finland.
Rouys, S. and Theuerkauf, J. 2003. Factors determining the distribution of introduced mammals in nature reserves of the southern province, New Caledonia. Wildlife Research. 30 (2): 187-191.
Summary: This paper discusses the distribution of introduced mammals in New Caledonia s southern nature reserves.
Sanders, M. D. and Maloney, R.F. 2002. Causes of mortality at nests of ground-nesting birds in the Upper Waitaki Basin, South Island, New Zealand: A 5-year video study. Biological Conservation. 106 (2): 225-236.
Summary: This study looked at the causes of mortality for a range of ground-nesting birds in the Upper Waitaki Basin in New Zealand s South Island.
Say, L., Gaillard, J-M. and Pontier, D. 2002. Spatio-temporal variation in cat population density in a sub-Antarctic environment. Polar Biology. 25 (2): 90-95.
Summary: This study provides estimates of the population size of cats on Kerguelen Island.
Seabrook, Wendy., 1989. Feral cats (Felis catus) as predators of hatchling green turtles (Chelonia mydas). J. Zool., Lond. (1989) 219, 83-88
Smucker, T.D., Lindsey, G.D. and Mosher, S.M. 2000. Home range and diet of feral cats in Hawaii forests. Pacific Conservation Biology. 6 (3): 229-237.
Summary: This study looked at the home range and diet of feral cats in Hawaiian forests.
Thibault J.-C. 1988. Menaces et conservation des oiseaux de PolynCsie franqaise. Pages 87-124 in Livre rouge des oiseaux des rCgions franqaises d outre-mer. I.C.B.P., monographie 5.
Tidemann, C.R., Yorkston, H.D. and Russack, A.J. 1994. The diet of cats, Felis catus, on Christmas Island, Indian Ocean. Wildlife Research. 21 (3): 279-285.
Summary: This article discusses the diet of feral cats on Christmas Island, Indian Ocean.
Traveset, A. and Riera, N. 2005. Disruption of a plant-lizard seed dispersal system and its ecological effect on a threatened endemic plant in the Balearic Islands. Conservation Biology. 19 (2): 421-431.
Summary: This paper discusses the ecological impacts of cat predation on the Balearic Islands.
UAE Interact. Undated a. The Islands - Arzanah
Summary: Available from: http://www.uaeinteract.com/maps/et_09.asp [Accessed 16 May 2006]
UAE Interact. Undated b. The Islands - Zirku.
Summary: Available from: http://www.uaeinteract.com/maps/et_23.asp [Accessed 16 May 2006]
University of Michigan Museum of Zoology. 2006. Felis silvestris (wild cat). Animal Diversity Web.
Summary: Information on wild cats.
Available from: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Felis_silvestris.html [Accessed 16 May 2006]
Urtizberea, pers.comm., 2007
Summary: Personal communication with Frank Urtizberea, from the Direction de l Agriculture et de la For�t .
Wanless, R.M., Cunningham, J., Hockey, P.A.R., Wanless, J., White, R.W. and Wiseman, R. 2002. The success of a soft-release introduction of the flightless Aldabra rail (Dryolimnas (cuvieri) aldabranus) on Aldabra Atoll, Seychelles. Biological Conservation. 107 (2): 203-210.
Summary: This paper reports on the release of the Aldabra rail on to Aldabra Atoll in the Seychelles.
Watanabe, S., Nakanishi, N. and Izawa, M. 2003. Habitat and prey resource overlap between the Iriomote cat Prionailurus iriomotensis and introduced feral cat Felis catus based on assessment of scat content and distribution. Mammal Study. 28 (1): 47-56.
Summary: This paper examines the relationship and potential for competition between feral cats and the Iriomote cat on Iriomote Island, Japan.
Watling, D., 2001. A Survey Of The Terrestrial Vertebrate Fauna Of Nanuyalevu (Turtle Island), Yasawa, Ba
Summary: Available from: http://www.pacificbirds.com/nanuyalevutrip1.html [Accessed Feb 15 2005]
Weggler, M. and Leu, B. 2001. A source population of Black Redstarts (Phoenicurus ochruros) in villages with a high density of feral cats (Felis catus). Journal Fuer Ornithologie. 142 (3): 273-283.
Summary: This study looked at the impact of feral cat predation on a population of black redstarts in Switzerland.
Contact
The following 10 contacts offer information an advice on Felis catus
Bonnaud,
Elsa
Personal webpage
Website
Elsa works principally on food webs on island ecosystems, and especially on biotic interactions between invasive species (cats and rats) and natives species (seabirds and reptiles). She has worked on islands in the south of France, on New Caledonia and on some field missions in Polynesia and La R�union island. She is currently based in the Canary Islands.
Her research key words are: biodiversity, conservation, restoration, island ecosystems, population dynamics, food-web, diet, cat impact, cat ecology and behavior.
Organization:
Post Doctoral Position Island Ecology and Evolution Research Group IPNA-CSIC
Address:
C/ Astrof�sico Fco. S�nchez n� 3 38206 La Laguna Tenerife, Canary Islands SPAIN
Phone:
Fax:
Courchamp,
Franck
Ecology of introduced mammals
Organization:
Universite Paris-Sud XI
Address:
Batiment 362, F-91405, Orsay, Cedex, France.
Phone:
+33 1 69155685
Fax:
+33 1 69155696
Faulquier,
Lucie
Geographic region: Pacific
Ecosystem: Terrestrial
Organization:
Soci�t� d Ornithologie de Polyn�sie fran�aise
Address:
Soci�t� d Ornithologie de Polyn�sie B.P. 21098 98713 - Papeete Tahiti Polyn�sie Fran�aise
Phone:
(689) 52 11 00
Fax:
Gillies,
Craig
Felis catus ecology and management
Organization:
N.Z. Department of Conservation
Address:
Science & Technical Centre, Northern Regional Office, P.O. Box 112, Hamilton, New Zealand
Phone:
+64 7 8397247
Fax:
+64 7 8580001
Lecorre,
Matthieu
Geographic region: Indian Ocean
Ecosystem: Terrestrial
Organization:
Universit� de la R�union
Address:
Laboratoire d Ecologie marine (ECOMAR)-Facult� des Sciences et Technologies-Universit� de la R�union- BP 7151. Saint Denis. R�union
Phone:
0262.93.86.86
Fax:
McFadden,
Ian
Feral cat control, eradication and behavioural ecology
Organization:
N.Z. Department of Conservation
Address:
PO Box 10 420, Wellington 1, New Zealand
Phone:
+64 4 4710726
Fax:
+64 4 4713279
Pascal,
Michel
Geographic region: sub-Antarctic; North Africa; Pacific; Caribbean
Ecosystem: Terrestrial
Organization:
Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique
Address:
INRA - SCRIBE - Campus de Beaulieu - F35 042 Rennes
Phone:
(33) (0)2 23 48 53 79
Fax:
Rocamora,
G�rard
Geographic region: Indian Ocean
Ecosystem: Terrestrial
Organization:
Island Conservation Society / Fondation pour la Conservation des Iles (ou CRBPO, Museum National d�Histoire Naturelle, Paris)
Address:
Island Conservation Society, PO Box 775, Pointe Larue, Mah�, Seychelles
Phone:
(248) 71 44 11
Fax:
Triolo,
Julien
Geographic region: Indian Ocean
Ecosystem: Terrestrial
Organization:
Office National des For�ts
Address:
ONF. Domaine Forestier de la Providence, 97488 Saint Denis cedex
Phone:
692345283
Fax:
Urtizberea,
Frank
Geographic region: North America
Ecosystem: Terrestrial
Organization:
Direction de l Agriculture et de la For�
Address:
La Direction de l Agriculture et de la For�t 3, rue Albert Briand - B.P. 4244 97500 Saint-Pierre et Miquelon
Phone:
0508412104; 0508552100
Fax: