Global invasive species database

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Common name
Myrtle rust (English)
Synonym
Similar species
Summary
Uredo rangelii the cause of myrtle rust, is morphologically distinct from Puccinea psidii the cause of guava rust, although DNA sequence data place it within the P. psidii species complex. It is known from Jamaica and Argentina and was recently discovered in Australia where it has been detected at four locations. While it has not been discovered in native forest and containment operations are underway, there is potential for spread in eastern Australia.
Species Description
Uredo rangelii (myrtle rust) can be regarded as a member of the Puccinea psidii sensu lato (s.l., in the broad sense) complex. U. rangelii was only recently separated from P. psidii s.l. in a study of P. psidii collections (Simpson et al., 2006). Two collections on Myrtus communis from Argentina and Syzgium jambos from Jamaica had morphologically distinct urediniospores, which were newly described as U. rangelii. The urediniospores of P. psidii are completely echinulate and ellipsoidal to obovoid, compared to those of U. rangelii which are obovoid to pyriform with a smooth patch (tonsure) free of echinulations; an important taxonomic feature warranting the designation of a new species. Additionally the wall of the spore is slightly thicker and the size slightly larger in U. rangelii (Simpson et al., 2006). The teliospores are indistinguishable from P. psidii (Carnegie pers. comm., in New South Wales, Environment, Climate Change and Water, 2011). No telemorph stage is known for U. rangelii.\r\n

The DNA sequence of the rDNA ITS, tef-1a and ß-tubulin regions of U. rangelii are indistinguishable from those of P. psidii, and this species gives a positive result in the nested PCR developed to detect P. psidii (Langrell et al., 2008 in Carnegie et al., 2010; New South Wales, Environment, Climate Change and Water, 2011).

Notes
As U. rangelii was only recently separated from P. psidii s.l. (Simpson et al., 2006), it is likely that literature pertaining to guava rust, including host range and impact, includes reference to disease caused by U. rangelii (Carnegie et al., 2010).
Habitat Description
The known hosts of Uredo rangelii are in the tribes Myrteae and Syzgieae (Simpson). Known susceptible taxa include Myrtus communis, Syzgium jambos, Agonis, Callistemon and Syncarpia. Given the wide phylogenetic separation of these taxa, other new host records can be expected (Simpson et al., 2006; Carnegie et al., 2010).

Principal source:

Compiler: IUCN SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group

Review:

Publication date: 2011-08-31

Recommended citation: Global Invasive Species Database (2016) Species profile: Uredo rangelii. Downloaded from http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=1842 on 10-12-2016.

General Impacts
Uredo rangelii is pathogenic to plants belonging to the Myrtaceae family; a family to which many Australian native species like the Callistemons and Eucalyptus belong, the range of plants infected include Agonis flexuosa (willow myrtle), Callistemon viminalis (bottlebrush) and Syncarpia glomulifera (turpentine). Initial symptoms of U. rangelii may appear as small (1-5mm) purple flecks on young leaves, often with a faint chlorotic halo. These later develop into masses of characteristic bright yellow to orange powdery spores which may occur on both leaf surfaces. In severe infection these pustules may enlarge and coalesce. Pustules may turn grey with age (Carnegie et al., 2010). The rust affects young shoots and the growing tip of plants. The leaves become curled and distorted and new growth is killed.
Management Info
Based on the current distribution and spread of the disease, the Myrtle Rust National Management Group (NMG) in December 2010 concluded that it was not technically feasible to eradicate the rust in Australia. A series of response plans which focus on community education and reducing the impact of myrtle rust on the natural environment and commercial plantations has been developed. Quarantine restrictions have been put in place to prevent the sale of plants that have been infected with myrtle rust and the movement of infected plants interstate.

Containment operations were carried out at the initial infection site and the three other infected sites. Measures included weekly fungicide applications and diseased material was removed and destroyed (Carnegie et al., 2010).

Countries (or multi-country features) with distribution records for Uredo rangelii
ALIEN RANGE
NATIVE RANGE
Informations on Uredo rangelii has been recorded for the following locations. Click on the name for additional informations.
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Location Status Invasiveness Occurrence Source
Details of Uredo rangelii in information
Status
Invasiveness
Arrival date
Occurrence
Source
Introduction
Species notes for this location
Location note
Management notes for this location
Impact
Mechanism:
Outcome:
Ecosystem services:
Impact information
Uredo rangelii is pathogenic to plants belonging to the Myrtaceae family; a family to which many Australian native species like the Callistemons and Eucalyptus belong, the range of plants infected include Agonis flexuosa (willow myrtle), Callistemon viminalis (bottlebrush) and Syncarpia glomulifera (turpentine). Initial symptoms of U. rangelii may appear as small (1-5mm) purple flecks on young leaves, often with a faint chlorotic halo. These later develop into masses of characteristic bright yellow to orange powdery spores which may occur on both leaf surfaces. In severe infection these pustules may enlarge and coalesce. Pustules may turn grey with age (Carnegie et al., 2010). The rust affects young shoots and the growing tip of plants. The leaves become curled and distorted and new growth is killed.
Red List assessed species 0:
Management information
Based on the current distribution and spread of the disease, the Myrtle Rust National Management Group (NMG) in December 2010 concluded that it was not technically feasible to eradicate the rust in Australia. A series of response plans which focus on community education and reducing the impact of myrtle rust on the natural environment and commercial plantations has been developed. Quarantine restrictions have been put in place to prevent the sale of plants that have been infected with myrtle rust and the movement of infected plants interstate.

Containment operations were carried out at the initial infection site and the three other infected sites. Measures included weekly fungicide applications and diseased material was removed and destroyed (Carnegie et al., 2010).

Bibliography
11 references found for Uredo rangelii

Managment information
Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service (AQIS) , 2011. Myrtle Rust Questions and Answers
Summary: Available from: http://www.daff.gov.au/aqis/quarantine/pests-diseases/myrtle-rust/myrtle-rust-qa [Accessed 31 August 2011]
Biosecurity SA: Plant Health, 2011. Myrtle Rust. South Australia
Summary: Available from: http://www.pir.sa.gov.au/biosecuritysa/planthealth/emergency_plant_pests/myrtle_rust [Accessed 31 August 2011]
Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia, 2011. Pest alert - Myrtle rust (Uredo rangelii)
Summary: Available from: http://www.agric.wa.gov.au/PC_94039.html [Accessed 31 August 2011]
Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment- Biosecurity, Tasmania, 2011. Myrtle Rust
Summary: Available from: http://www.dpiw.tas.gov.au/inter.nsf/WebPages/MCAS-8DV22F?open [Accessed 31 August 2011]
Department of Primary Industries, Victoria, 2011. Forestry - Myrtle Rust
Summary: Available from: http://new.dpi.vic.gov.au/forestry/pests-diseases-weeds/diseases/myrtle-rust [Accessed 31 August 2011]
National pests and disease outbreaks, Australia, 2011. Myrtle Rust
Summary: Available from: http://www.outbreak.gov.au/pests_diseases/pests_diseases_plant/myrtle-rust/index.html [Accessed 31 August 2011]
Primary Industries and Fisheries, Queensland Government, 2011. What is Myrtle Rust?
Summary: Available from: http://www.dpi.qld.gov.au/4790_17185.htm [Accessed 31 August 2011]
Primary Industries, Biosecurity New South Wales, 2011. Myrtle Rust
Summary: Available from: http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/biosecurity/plant/myrtle-rust [Accessed 31 August 2011]
General information
Carnegie, A. J.; Lidbetter, J. R.; Walker, J.; Horwood, M. A.; Tesoriero, L.; Glen, M.; Priest, M. J. 2010. Uredo rangelii, a taxon in the guava rust complex, newly recorded on Myrtaceae in Australia. Australasian Plant Pathology. 39(5). 2010. 463-466.
New South Wales, Environment, Climate Change and Water, 2011. Myrtle Rust: Taxonomic Knowledge. Edward Liew, Manager Plant Pathology, Botanic Gardens Trust
Summary: Available from: http://www.anbg.gov.au/chabg/myrtle-rust/powerpoint/Liew-Myrtle-Rust-Taxonomy-anbg-Mar-2011.pdf [Accessed 31 August 2011]
Simpson, J. A.; Thomas, K.; Grgurinovic, C. A., 2006. Uredinales species pathogenic on species of Myrtaceae. Australasian Plant Pathology. 35(5). 2006. 549-562.
Contact
The following 0 contacts offer information an advice on Uredo rangelii