Global invasive species database

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Common name
grim-the-collier (English), devil's-paintbrush (English), devil's weed (English), red daisy flameweed (English), orange paintbrush (English), king-devil (English), fox-and-cubs (English), orange hawkweed (English), épervière orangée (French)
Synonym
Pilosella aurantiaca , (L.) F. W. Schultz & Sch. Bip.
Similar species
Summary
Orange hawkweed, Hieracium aurantiacum is a perennial herb native to Europe. It has distinctive orange flowers which appear over summer until early autumn and produce tiny black seeds. H. aurantiacum can also spread vegetatively via stolons. The ability ofH. aurantiacum to grow in a range of conditions - it is both snow and frost tolerant, and can grow in gravelly and acidic soils, full sun through to part shade and semi-arid through to humid environments - increases its invasiveness. H. aurantiacum has been known to invade disturbed ecosystems, roadsides, grasslands, pastures, open forests, alpine meadows and other mountain habitats. H. aurantiacum has been described as a 'sleeper weed' in Australia, i.e., a weed that spreads significantly and grows significantly in population many years (usually 50+ years) after naturalisation.
Pathway

Principal source:

Compiler: IUCN SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG) with support from the Overseas Territories Environmental Programme (OTEP) project XOT603, a joint project with the Cayman Islands Government - Department of Environment

Review:

Publication date: 2010-09-24

Recommended citation: Global Invasive Species Database (2021) Species profile: Hieracium aurantiacum. Downloaded from http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=1747 on 28-09-2021.

Management Info
Hieracium aurantiacum is considered a weed in Australia, the United States, Canada and New Zealand. It is thought that early detection and eradication is the most effective method for preventing H. aurantiacum from spreading into new areas. Control can be relatively simple if planned correctly, as H. aurantiacum can spread easily via seeds and stolons. H. aurantiacum can be managed using chemical methods, i.e. the application of herbicide (in spring for best results) followed by no mowing or slashing for at least two weeks. Plants can also be carefully dug out, ensuring no roots or runnners are left behind - H. aurantiacum can quickly regrow from fragments. (Beaumont et al. 2009a; CRC 2003).
Countries (or multi-country features) with distribution records for Hieracium aurantiacum
NATIVE RANGE
  • austria
  • bulgaria
  • czech republic
  • ex-yugoslavia
  • finland
  • france
  • germany
  • italy
  • norway
  • poland
  • romania
  • sweden
  • switzerland
  • ukraine
Informations on Hieracium aurantiacum has been recorded for the following locations. Click on the name for additional informations.
Lorem Ipsum
Location Status Invasiveness Occurrence Source
Details of Hieracium aurantiacum in information
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Impact information
Red List assessed species 0:
Management information
Hieracium aurantiacum is considered a weed in Australia, the United States, Canada and New Zealand. It is thought that early detection and eradication is the most effective method for preventing H. aurantiacum from spreading into new areas. Control can be relatively simple if planned correctly, as H. aurantiacum can spread easily via seeds and stolons. H. aurantiacum can be managed using chemical methods, i.e. the application of herbicide (in spring for best results) followed by no mowing or slashing for at least two weeks. Plants can also be carefully dug out, ensuring no roots or runnners are left behind - H. aurantiacum can quickly regrow from fragments. (Beaumont et al. 2009a; CRC 2003).
Locations
AUSTRALIA
FALKLAND ISLANDS (MALVINAS)
Management Category
Prevention
Bibliography
18 references found for Hieracium aurantiacum

Management information
Beaumont, Linda J., Rachael V. Gallagher, Paul O. Downey, Wilfried Thuiller, Michelle R. Leishman and Lesley Hughes, 2009b. Modelling the impact of Hieracium spp. on protected areas in Australia under future climates. Ecography 32: 757 764, 2009
Beaumont, Linda J., Rachael V. Gallagher, Wilfried Thuiller, Paul O. Downey, Michelle R. Leishman and Lesley Hughes, 2009. Different climatic envelopes among invasive populations may lead to underestimations of current and future biological invasions. Diversity and Distributions, (Diversity Distrib.)(2009) 15, 409�420
CRC, 2003. Weed Management Guide: Orange hawkweed (Hieracium aurantiacum)
Summary: Available from: http://www.weeds.gov.au/publications/guidelines/alert/pubs/h-aurantiacum.pdf [Accessed 26 July 2010]
Glanznig, A. and Kessal, O. 2004. Invasive Plants of National Importance and their Legal Status by State and Territory. WWF Australia: Sydney
Groves, R. H., 2006. Are some weeds sleeping? Some concepts and reasons. Euphytica Volume 148, Numbers 1-2, 111-120
Hauser, Cindy E. and Michael A. McCarthy, 2009. Streamlining search and destroy : cost-effective surveillance for invasive species management. Ecology Letters, (2009) 12: 683�692
IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG)., 2010. A Compilation of Information Sources for Conservation Managers.
Summary: This compilation of information sources can be sorted on keywords for example: Baits & Lures, Non Target Species, Eradication, Monitoring, Risk Assessment, Weeds, Herbicides etc. This compilation is at present in Excel format, this will be web-enabled as a searchable database shortly. This version of the database has been developed by the IUCN SSC ISSG as part of an Overseas Territories Environmental Programme funded project XOT603 in partnership with the Cayman Islands Government - Department of Environment. The compilation is a work under progress, the ISSG will manage, maintain and enhance the database with current and newly published information, reports, journal articles etc.
Washington State Department of Agriculture, 2009. 2009 Washington State Noxious Weed List
Summary: Available from: http://www.nwcb.wa.gov/documents/weed%20lists/State%20Weed%20List%202009.pdf [Accessed 26 July 2010]
Wilson, Linda M., 2006. Key to Identification of Invasive and Native Hawkweeds (Hieracium spp.) in the Pacific Northwest. B. C. Min. For. Prac. Br., Kamloops, B. C
Summary: Available from: http://www.cals.uidaho.edu/hawkweed/pdf/Key%20to%20ID%20Native%20Hawkweeds%20of%20PNW%20Linda%20Wilson.pdf [Accessed 26 July 2010]
General information
Global Compendium of Weeds (GCW) 2007. Hieracium aurantiacum (Asteraceae).
Summary: Available from: http://www.hear.org/gcw/species/hieracium_aurantiacum/ [Accessed 21 September 2010]
Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS), 2010. Hieracium aurantiacum L.
Summary: Available from: http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=37697 [Accessed 26 July 2010]
Jones, Alexis; Crone, Elizabeth, 2009. The effect of disturbance history on hawkweed invasion (Montana) Ecological Restoration. 27:2: 139-141.
Summary: Available from: http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs_other/rmrs_2009_jones_a001.pdf [Accessed 26 July 2010]
McDougall, Keith L., John W. Morgan, Neville G. Walsh, Richard J. Williams, 2005. Plant invasions in treeless vegetation of the Australian Alps. Perspectives in Plant Ecology, Evolution and Systematics 7 (2005) 159�171
Williams S. G. Nicholas, Amy K. Hahs and John W. Morgan, 2008. A dispersal-constrained habitat suitability model for predicting invasion of alpine vegetation. Ecological Applications, 18(2), 2008, pp. 347�359
Contact
The following 0 contacts offer information an advice on Hieracium aurantiacum
Hieracium aurantiacum
grim-the-collier, devil's-paintbrush, devil's weed, red daisy flameweed, orange paintbrush, king-devil, fox-and-cubs, orange hawkweed, épervière orangée
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Recommended citation
(2021). Hieracium aurantiacum. IUCN Environmental Impact Classification for Alien Taxa (EICAT).