Global invasive species database

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Common name
Cape Honeysuckle (English), Bignone (French), Bouquet (French), jasmin du Cap (French), ‘i‘iwi haole (Hawaiian, Hawaiian Islands), técome (French), chèvrefeuille du Cap (French)
Synonym
Tecomaria capensis , (Thunb.) Spach
Tecomaria capensis , subsp. capensis
Tecomaria capensis , subsp. nyassae
Bigonia capensis
Similar species
Summary
Tecoma capensis consists of two subspecies within its native range; Tecoma capensis subsp. capensis which is found in South Africa, Swaziland and Mozambique, and Tecoma capensis subsp. nyassae which is found in Tanzania, The Democratic Republic of Congo, Angola, Zambia, Malawi and Mozambique. It is not known which subspecies however is that which is becoming invasive worldwide. Various countries have identified the species in their invasive species plans; Anguilla, Australia and New Zealand, however it is only on the island of Rangitoto in Auckland, New Zealand, where specific actions have been identified to contain the species. In Tanzania the species is found to have spread from unknown introduction around the Amani Botanical Gardens. Evidence from this study and from studies in New Zealand and Queensland, Australia suggests that the species spreads and becomes naturalised from being planted as an ornamental within landscaped areas.
Species Description
Native in tropical Africa, Tecoma capensis subsp. nyassae has a longer calyx than southern species Tecoma capensis subsp. capensis; over 10mm compared to up to 8mm. Also the tropical specimens can be easily recognised by their more vigourous growth and larger leaves with more and larger leaflets. T. capensis subsp. nyassae tends to grow as a tree, reaching heights of up to 7m, where as T. capensis subsp. capensis grows more as a shrub (Brummitt, 1974). T. capensis is described by Whistler (2000; pp. 451-452; as seen in PIER, 2010) as \"a vine-like shrub or shrub. Leaves odd-pinnately compound, opposite, leaflets of five to nine, blades ovate to round, 1-4 cm long with toothed margins. It flowers continuously through the year; flowers several, borne in short terminal racemes or narrow panicles. Corolla of fused petals, funnel-shaped, curved, 4-6 cm long, two-lipped with five oblong spreading lobes, bright orange or scarlet. Fruit are narrow linear capsules 7-18 cm long, containing many winged seeds\"
Notes
Brummitt (1974) notes that eight species have been described in the Tecomaria genus, divided into five northen species and three southern species. Brenan (1954; as decribed in Brummitt, 1974) sunk the five northern species into one, T. nyassae (Oliv.) K. Schum., and White (1962; as described in Brummitt, 1974) sunk the three southern species into T. capensis (Thunb.) Spach.
Uses
Tecoma capensis is typically used for ornamental purposes (Healy, 1958; Queensland Herbarium, 2002; Dawson et al, 2008).
Habitat Description
Tecoma capensis thrives in wet or dry areas and prefers a well-drained, fertile soil with a pH of 5.5-6.5\" (Staples & Herbst, 2005; p. 189; as seen in PIER, 2010).
Reproduction
Tecoma capensis reproduces via both seed and runner (which root wherever they touch the ground) (Staples & Herbst, 2005; p. 189; as seen in PIER, 2010)

Principal source:

Compiler: IUCN SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG) with support from the Overseas Territories Environmental Programme (OTEP) project XOT603, a joint project with the Cayman Islands Government - Department of Environment

Review:

Publication date: 2010-06-08

Recommended citation: Global Invasive Species Database (2021) Species profile: Tecoma capensis. Downloaded from http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=1591 on 19-01-2021.

General Impacts
Various countries have identified Tecoma capensis in their invasive species plans; Anguilla, Australia and New Zealand. Specific actions have been identified to contain the species on the island of Rangitoto in Auckland, New Zealand (Wotherspoon & Wotherspoon, 2002). In Tanzania the species is found to have spread from unknown introduction around the Amani Botanical Gardens (Dawson et al, 2008). Evidence from this study and from studies in New Zealand (Healy, 1958) and Queensland, Australia (Queensland Herbarium, 2002) suggests that the species spreads and becomes naturalised from being planted as an ornamental within landscaped areas.
Management Info
Preventative measures: A Risk Assessment of Tecoma capensis for Hawai‘i and other Pacific islands was prepared by Dr. Curtis Daehler (UH Botany) with funding from the Kaulunani Urban Forestry Program and US Forest Service. The alien plant screening system is derived from Pheloung et al. (1999) with minor modifications for use in Pacific islands (Daehler et al. 2004). The result is a score of 6 and a recommendation of: \"Likely to cause significant ecological or economic harm in Hawai‘i and on other Pacific Islands as determined by a high WRA score, which is based on published sources describing species biology and behaviour in Hawai‘i and/or other parts of the world.\"

Several other countries, Anguilla, Australia and New Zealand, have identified T. capensis within their invasive species plans. Specific actions have been identified to contain the species on the island of Rangitoto in Auckland, New Zealand (Wotherspoon & Wotherspoon, 2002). This includes containing the species to a zero-density over 5 years, and eradicating the species over a long-term of 15 years (Wotherspoon & Wotherspoon, 2002).

The Queensland Herbarium has created a \"ranked list\" of \"Invasive Naturalised Plants in Southeast Queensland\". T. capensis is ranked 166, with an invasiveness score of 4 out of 5 (5 highest; 3 moderate) and described as a small tree that has escaped from ornamental and landscape conditions (Queensland Herbarium, 2002)

Countries (or multi-country features) with distribution records for Tecoma capensis
Informations on Tecoma capensis has been recorded for the following locations. Click on the name for additional informations.
Lorem Ipsum
Location Status Invasiveness Occurrence Source
Details of Tecoma capensis in information
Status
Invasiveness
Arrival date
Occurrence
Source
Introduction
Species notes for this location
Location note
Management notes for this location
Impact
Mechanism:
Outcome:
Ecosystem services:
Impact information
Various countries have identified Tecoma capensis in their invasive species plans; Anguilla, Australia and New Zealand. Specific actions have been identified to contain the species on the island of Rangitoto in Auckland, New Zealand (Wotherspoon & Wotherspoon, 2002). In Tanzania the species is found to have spread from unknown introduction around the Amani Botanical Gardens (Dawson et al, 2008). Evidence from this study and from studies in New Zealand (Healy, 1958) and Queensland, Australia (Queensland Herbarium, 2002) suggests that the species spreads and becomes naturalised from being planted as an ornamental within landscaped areas.
Red List assessed species 0:
Management information
Preventative measures: A Risk Assessment of Tecoma capensis for Hawai‘i and other Pacific islands was prepared by Dr. Curtis Daehler (UH Botany) with funding from the Kaulunani Urban Forestry Program and US Forest Service. The alien plant screening system is derived from Pheloung et al. (1999) with minor modifications for use in Pacific islands (Daehler et al. 2004). The result is a score of 6 and a recommendation of: \"Likely to cause significant ecological or economic harm in Hawai‘i and on other Pacific Islands as determined by a high WRA score, which is based on published sources describing species biology and behaviour in Hawai‘i and/or other parts of the world.\"

Several other countries, Anguilla, Australia and New Zealand, have identified T. capensis within their invasive species plans. Specific actions have been identified to contain the species on the island of Rangitoto in Auckland, New Zealand (Wotherspoon & Wotherspoon, 2002). This includes containing the species to a zero-density over 5 years, and eradicating the species over a long-term of 15 years (Wotherspoon & Wotherspoon, 2002).

The Queensland Herbarium has created a \"ranked list\" of \"Invasive Naturalised Plants in Southeast Queensland\". T. capensis is ranked 166, with an invasiveness score of 4 out of 5 (5 highest; 3 moderate) and described as a small tree that has escaped from ornamental and landscape conditions (Queensland Herbarium, 2002)

Locations
Management Category
Prevention
Control
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Unknown
Monitoring
Bibliography
19 references found for Tecoma capensis

Managment information
Csurhes, S & R. Edwards, 1998. Potential Environmental Weeds in Australia. Queensland Department of Natural Resources
Summary: Available from: http://www.weeds.gov.au/publications/books/pubs/potential.pdf [Accessed May 1 2010]
Dawson, Wayne., Ahmed S. Mndolwa., David F. R. P. Burslem., Philip E. Hulme., 2008. Assessing the risks of plant invasions arising from collections in tropical botanical gardens. Biodivers Conserv (2008) 17:1979�1995
Howell, Clayson., 2008. Consolidated list of environmental weeds in New Zealand. DOC Research & Development Series 292
Summary: Available from: http://www.doc.govt.nz/upload/documents/science-and-technical/drds292.pdf [Accessed May 1 2010]
IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG)., 2010. A Compilation of Information Sources for Conservation Managers.
Summary: This compilation of information sources can be sorted on keywords for example: Baits & Lures, Non Target Species, Eradication, Monitoring, Risk Assessment, Weeds, Herbicides etc. This compilation is at present in Excel format, this will be web-enabled as a searchable database shortly. This version of the database has been developed by the IUCN SSC ISSG as part of an Overseas Territories Environmental Programme funded project XOT603 in partnership with the Cayman Islands Government - Department of Environment. The compilation is a work under progress, the ISSG will manage, maintain and enhance the database with current and newly published information, reports, journal articles etc.
Morton, F. Julia, 1976. Pestiferous spread of many ornamental and fruit species in Florida. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 89:348-353. 1976.
Summary: Available from: http://www.fshs.org/Proceedings/Password%20Protected/1976%20Vol.%2089/348-353%20(MORTON).pdf [Accessed May 1 2010]
Pacific Islands Ecosystems at Risk (PIER), 2005. Tecoma capensis
Summary: Available from: http://www.hear.org/pier/species/tecoma_capensis.htm [Accessed May 1 2010]
Pacific Islands Ecosystems at Risk (PIER), 2005. Tecoma capensis Risk Assessment
Summary: Available from: http://www.hear.org/pier/wra/pacific/tecoma_capensis_htmlwra.htm [Accessed May 1 2010]
General information
Brummitt, R. K., 1974. Variation and Distribution of the African Species Tecomaria capensis (Bignoniaceae). Bulletin du Jardin botanique national de Belgique / Bulletin van de National Plantentuin van Belgi�, Vol. 44, No. 3/4 (Dec. 31, 1974), pp. 419-423
Connor, A. Rhon, 2008. Anguilla Invasive Species strategy (2008) draft
Summary: Available from: http://www.gov.ai/documents/Anguilla%20Invasive%20Species%20Strategy%202008%20(2).pdf [Accessed May 1 2010]
Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS), 2010. Tecoma capensis (Thunb.) Lindl.
Summary: Available from: http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=505435 [Accessed May 1 2010]
Reddy, K. Sudhakar, G. Bagyanarayana, K. N. Reddy, Vatsavaya S. Raju., 2008. Invasive aliens flora of India. Published by National Biological Information Infrastructure, USGS, USA
Summary: Available from: http://www.gisinetwork.org/IndiaInvasivePlants/documents/assessment_Invasive_India-jan08.pdf [Accessed May 1 2010]
The Gibralter Ornithological & Natural History Society, undated. Botanic Gardens > Plants
Summary: Available from: http://www.gibraltar.gi/nature/?language=en&category=1&item=4 [Accessed May 1 2010]
Contact
The following 0 contacts offer information an advice on Tecoma capensis
Tecoma capensis
Cape Honeysuckle (English), Bignone (French), Bouquet (French), jasmin du Cap (French), ‘i‘iwi haole (Hawaiian, Hawaiian Islands), técome (French), chèvrefeuille du Cap (French)
Assessor
Assessment date
Eicat category
Justification for EICAT assessment
Confidence rating
Mechanism(s) of maximum impact
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Recommended citation
EICAT (2021) Assessment of: Tecoma capensis. Downloaded from http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=1591 on 19-01-2021.