Global invasive species database

  • General
  • Distribution
  • Impact
  • Management
  • Bibliography
  • Contact
prev
  • Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Photo: CAFS, http://zzzy.cafs.ac.cn/ )
  • Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Photo: CAFS, http://zzzy.cafs.ac.cn/ )
  • Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Photo: CAFS, http://zzzy.cafs.ac.cn/ )
  • Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Photo: Johnny Jensen, www.fishbase.org)
next
Common name
panispis (English, Philippines), Japanese loach (English), nai chau (Cantonese, Hong Kong), pond loach (English), weather loach (English), dojo loach (English), Aasianmutakala (Finnish, Finland), kinesisk smerling (Danish, Denmark), Amur mud loach (English), oriental weatherloach (English), loche asiatique (French, France), kinesisk Vejrfisk (Danish, Denmark), mud loach (English), oriental weatherfish (English), Amur weatherfish (English), Asian pond loach (English), loche d'étang (French, France), vostochnyi (Russian), amurskii v'yun (Russian), Ostasiatischer Schlammpeitzger (German, Germany), Chinese weatherfish (English), dojou (Japanese, Japan), Japanese weatherfish (English), misgurno (Spanish, Spain), u-u (English, Philippines), dojo (Tagalog, Philippines), misgurno de Asia (Spanish, Spain), cá Chạ ch bùn (Vietnamese, Viet Nam), cá diét (Vietnamese, Cambodia), dojô (Japanese, Japan)
Synonym
Cobitis anguillicaudata , (Cantor, 1842)
Misgurnus crossochilus , (Sauvage, 1878)
Misgurnus anguillicaudatus anguillicaudatus , (Cantor, 1842)
Misgurnus fossilis anguillicaudatus , (Cantor, 1842)
Misgurnus lividus , (Sauvage & Dabry de Thirersant)
Misgurnus mizolepis elongatus , (Kimura, 1934)
Misgurnus mizolepis grangeri , (Nichols, 1925)
Misgurnus mizolepis multimaculatus , (Rendahl, 1944)
Misgurnus mizolepis punctatus , (Oshima, 1926)
Misgurnus mizolepis unicolor , (Lin, 1932)
Misgurnus mohoity leopardus , (Nichols, 1925)
Misgurnus mohoity yunnan , (Nichols, 1925)
Misgurnus multimaculatus , (Rendahl, 1944)
Ussuria leptocephala , (Nikolskii, 1903)
Similar species
Summary
Misgurnus anguillicaudatus is a weatherfish native to southeast Asia that has established populations in Europe, Australia, and the United States. It is an important food fish common to aquaculture and the majority of its introductions are believed to be the result of escapes from fish farms. Although little is known about its impacts it has the potential to compete with native fish for resources, reduce macroinvertebrate populations, and decrease water quality.
Species Description
Misgurnus anguillicaudatus is brown to yellow with greenish, gray-brown to black marbling, with a paler ventral. Its eel-like body is long, laterally compressed, commonly measuring around 15 cm, but reaching a maximum size near 30 cm. It has a small, narrow mouth and subinferior with 10 barbels, 4 of them, clearly smaller than the other, placed below the lower lip. Its lips are thick and fleshy. Its lateral line is short and does not exceed the length of the pectoral fin. It pectoral fins are triangular with a stout spine. The dorsal fin originates above the pelvic fin origin and is single and short-based. It bears conspicuous adipose crests along the ventral and dorsal mid-lines of the caudal peduncle. It also has a characteristic dark spot in the upper half of the base of the caudal fin. It has 9 dorsal rays, 6-7 pelvic rays, and 7-8 anal rays. Generally males have larger pectoral fins and females fuller abdomens (Nico & Fuller, 2010; Froese & Pauly, 2010; Australian Museum, 2009).
Notes
In rice paddies of their native range in Asia Misgurnus agnuillicaudatus up roots weeds with its feeding activity and is considered beneficial by rice farmers (Keller & Lake, 1994). The weatherfish derives this common name from its increase in activity as a result of changes in barometric pressure (Nico & Fuller, 2010).
Uses
Misgurnus anguillicaudatus is an important commercial food fish, a common live bait fish, and common aquarium fish. These trades are believed to be the main causes of their introduced populations.
Habitat Description
Misgurnus anguillicaudatus is a freshwater fish that inhabits the demersal layer of rivers, lakes, ponds swamps, and rice fields. It prefers still or gently flowing waters with muddy bottoms and silty substrates. They commonly burrow into muck and leaf litter with their head sticking out. M. anguillicaudatus typically inhabits subtropical climates with a temperature range of 5°C - 25°C and a latitudinal range of 53°N - 27°S . However, it has been found to tolerate temperatures as low as 2°C and as high as 30°C. M. anguillicaudatus may utilize atmospheric air to survive low oxygenated waters, through an adaptation of the digestive tract (Froese & Pauly, 2010; Gestring & Stanford, undated; Chang et al., 2009; McMahon & Burggren, 1987).
Reproduction
Misgurnus anguillicaudatus is an external fertilizer. Males wrap their body around the female and stimulate the release of eggs which it then fertilizes. Its eggs are scattered in the open water and along substratum and are not guarded. M. anguillicaudatus has demonstrated a high reproductive potential. It has been shown to be able to migrate to paddy fields to spawn as a substitute for flood plains (Froese & Pauly, 2010; Fujimoto et al., 2007; Koster et al., 2002).
Nutrition
Misgurnus anguillicaudatus preys on insects, insect larvae, crustaceans, annelids, algae, detritus, and other small aquatic organisms (Tabor et al., 2001). It does not forage by sight but rather chemical stimuli sensed by their barbels. They feed by taking mouthfuls of sediment and filtering food items (Gestring & Stanford, undated; Froese & Pauly, 2010).
Pathway
Misgurnus anguillicaudatus is an ornamental fish common to aquarium trade as well as a live bait fish. Many of its introductions to new locations are the result of its importation as such (Franch et al, 2008).

Principal source:
Froese, R. & Pauly, D. 2010. Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Cantor, 1842). FishBase.\r\n
Nico, L. & Fuller, P. 2010. Misgurnus anguillicaudatus. USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database, Gainesville, FL.\r\n
Freyhof, J., Korte, E. 2005. The first record of Misgurnus anguillicaudatus in Germany. Journal of Fish Biology. 66(2): 568-571.

Compiler: National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) & IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG)

Review: Miguelito Clavero, Grup d�Ecologia del Paisatge, �rea de Biodiversitat, Centre Tecnol�gic Forestal de Catalunya

Publication date: 2010-04-15

Recommended citation: Global Invasive Species Database (2018) Species profile: Misgurnus anguillicaudatus. Downloaded from http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=1537 on 14-11-2018.

General Impacts
Misgurnus anguillicaudatus was found to cause significant reductions in macroinvertebrate numbers and biomass in experimental conditions. It is also associated with elevated ammonia, nitrate/nitrite (NOx), and turbidity levels, having a similar effect on water quality as carp (Cyprinus carpio). There is concern that M. anguillicaudatus may impact native fishes by reducing populations of macroinvertebrate prey, competing for shelter and spawning sites, and preying on eggs and juveniles. Such impacts combined with its environmental adaptability, high competitive ability, high reproductive capacity, high survivorship, and high dispersal ability make it a potentially problematic invasive. In Hawaii it is reported as having an intermediate ecological effect in Hawaii based on its habitat, diet, and populations (Keller & Lake, 2007; Koster et al, 2002; Freyhoff & Korte, 2005; Nico & Fuller 2010).
Management Info
Preventative measures: Although little has been proven about the ecological impacts of Misgurnus anguillicaudatus researchers urge fisheries managers to prevent its establishment and further dispersal based on its speculated impacts. Australia banned the importation of M. anguillicaudatus in 1986. Increasing awareness to the public and to commercial fisheries may help reduce introductions and aid in the detection of new populations. Additional research is required to determine the range of impacts caused by M. anguillicaudatus and to evaluate management methods (Koster et al, 2002).
Countries (or multi-country features) with distribution records for Misgurnus anguillicaudatus
ALIEN RANGE
NATIVE RANGE
  • cambodia
  • china
  • hong kong
  • india
  • korea, democratic people's republic of
  • korea, republic of
  • lao people's democratic republic
  • myanmar
  • russian federation
  • taiwan
  • thailand
  • viet nam
Informations on Misgurnus anguillicaudatus has been recorded for the following locations. Click on the name for additional informations.
Lorem Ipsum
Location Status Invasiveness Occurrence Source
Details of Misgurnus anguillicaudatus in information
Status
Invasiveness
Arrival date
Occurrence
Source
Introduction
Species notes for this location
Location note
Management notes for this location
Impact
Mechanism:
Outcome:
Ecosystem services:
Impact information
Misgurnus anguillicaudatus was found to cause significant reductions in macroinvertebrate numbers and biomass in experimental conditions. It is also associated with elevated ammonia, nitrate/nitrite (NOx), and turbidity levels, having a similar effect on water quality as carp (Cyprinus carpio). There is concern that M. anguillicaudatus may impact native fishes by reducing populations of macroinvertebrate prey, competing for shelter and spawning sites, and preying on eggs and juveniles. Such impacts combined with its environmental adaptability, high competitive ability, high reproductive capacity, high survivorship, and high dispersal ability make it a potentially problematic invasive. In Hawaii it is reported as having an intermediate ecological effect in Hawaii based on its habitat, diet, and populations (Keller & Lake, 2007; Koster et al, 2002; Freyhoff & Korte, 2005; Nico & Fuller 2010).
Red List assessed species 0:
Locations
AUSTRALIA
Mechanism
[1] Disease transmission
Outcomes
[1] Environmental Species - Population
  • [1] Plant/animal health
Management information
Preventative measures: Although little has been proven about the ecological impacts of Misgurnus anguillicaudatus researchers urge fisheries managers to prevent its establishment and further dispersal based on its speculated impacts. Australia banned the importation of M. anguillicaudatus in 1986. Increasing awareness to the public and to commercial fisheries may help reduce introductions and aid in the detection of new populations. Additional research is required to determine the range of impacts caused by M. anguillicaudatus and to evaluate management methods (Koster et al, 2002).
Locations
AUSTRALIA
Management Category
Prevention
Bibliography
21 references found for Misgurnus anguillicaudatus

Managment information
Chang, Andrew L.; Grossman, Judah D.; Spezio, Teresa Sabol; Weiskel, Heidi W.; Blum, Julia C.; Burt, Jennifer W.; Muir, Adrianna A.; Piovia-Scott, Jonah; Veblen, Kari E.; Grosholz, Edwin D., 2009. Tackling aquatic invasions: risks and opportunities for the aquarium fish industry. Biological Invasions. 11(4). APR 2009. 773-785.
Gestring, Kelly, B., & Murray S Stanford., undated. Third Annual Progress Report for Recently Introduced Exotic Fishs 1999-2000
Han, M.; Fukushima, M.; Fukushima, T., 2008. A spatial linkage between dams and non-native fish species in Hokkaido, Japan. Ecology of Freshwater Fish. 17(3). SEP 2008. 416-424.
Rixon, Corinne A.M., Ian C. Duggan, Nathalie M.N. Bergeron, Anthony Ricciardi and Hugh J. MacIssac., 2005. Invasion risks posed by the aquarium trade and live fish markets on the Laurentian Great Lakes. Biodiversity and Conservation 14: 1365�1381, 2005
Schultz E. E., 1960. Establishment and early dispersal of a loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Cantor), in Michigan. Trans Am Fish Soc 89:376�377.
General information
Australia Museum, 2009. Oriental Weatherloach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus Cantor, 1842
Summary: Available from: http://australianmuseum.net.au/Oriental-Weatherloach-Misgurnus-anguillicaudatus-Cantor-1842 [Accessed 16 November 2009]
Franch, N., Clavero, M., Garrido, M., Gaya, N., Lopez, V., Pou-Rovira, Q., Queral, J. M. 2008. On the establishment and range expansion of oriental weatherfish (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus ) in NE Iberian Peninsula. Biological Invasions. 10(8). DEC 2008. 1327-1331.
Freyhof, J., Korte, E. 2005. The first record of Misgurnus anguillicaudatus in Germany. Journal of Fish Biology. 66(2). February 2005. 568-571.
Froese, R. & Pauly, D. 2010. Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Cantor, 1842). FishBase.
Summary: Available from: http://www.fishbase.org/Summary/SpeciesSummary.php?id=3016
Fujimoto, Y., Ouchi, Y., Hakuba, T., Chiba, H., Iwata, M. 2007. Influence of modern irrigation, drainage system and water management on spawning migration of mud loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus C. Earth and Environmental Science, Volume 81, Number 2 / February, 2008.
Gillespie, Graeme and Jean-Marc Hero., 1999. Potential Impacts of Introduced Fish and Fish Translocations on Australian Amphibians In Declines and Disappearance of Australian Frogs (Ed Alastair Campbell) Published by Environment Australia
Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission, 2010. Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Cantor, 1842)
Summary: Available from: http://nis.gsmfc.org/nis_factsheet.php?toc_id=192 [Accessed 16 November 2009]
Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS)., 2010. Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Cantor, 1842)
Summary: Available from: http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=163978 [Accessed 16 November 2009]
Keller, R. P., Lake, P. S. 2007. Potential impacts of a recent and rapidly spreading coloniser of Australian freshwaters: Oriental weatherloach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus ). Ecology of Freshwater Fish. 16(2). JUN 2007. 124-132.
Logan, Daniel J.; Bibles, Erin L.; Markle, Douglas F., 1996. Recent collections of exotic aquarium fishes in the freshwaters of Oregon and thermal tolerance of oriental weatherfish and pirapatinga. California Fish & Game. 82(2). 1996. 66-80
McMahon, Brian. R. and Burggren, Warren. W. 1987. Respiratory Physiology of Intestinal Air Breathing in the Teleost Fish Misgurnus anguillicaudatus . 7. exp. Biol. 133, 371-393 (19S7)
Nico, Leo and Pam Fuller. 2010. Misgurnus anguillicaudatus . USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database, Gainesville, FL.
Summary: Available from: http://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/FactSheet.asp?speciesID=498 [Accessed 16 November 2009]
Raadik, TA and Koster, W. 2004. Potential spread and impact of a little known alien fish introduced into Australia: the Oriental weatherloach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus ). New Zealand, Wellington. p. 562. Aug 2004.
Razzetti, Edoardo, Nardi, Pietro Angelo, Strosselli, Silvia, Bernini, Franco. 2000. [First record of Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Cantor, 1842) in Italian inland watercourses. (Osteichthyes: Cobitidae).]. Prima segnalazione di Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Cantor, 1842) in acque interne (Osteichthyes: Cobitidae) [Italian].
Simon, Thomas P., Bright, Greg, Veraldi, Frank, Smith, James R., Stahl, James R. 2006. New records for the alien oriental weatherfish, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus , in the Lake Michigan basin, Indiana (Cypriniformes : Cobitidae). Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science. 115(1). 2006. 32-36.
Tabor, Roger A., Warner, Eric, Hager, Stephen. 2001. An oriental weatherfish (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus ) population established in Washington State. Northwest Science. 75(1). Winter, 2001. 72-76.
Contact
The following 1 contacts offer information an advice on Misgurnus anguillicaudatus
Clavero,
Miguelito
Organization:
Grup d�Ecologia del Paisatge, �rea de Biodiversitat, Centre Tecnol�gic Forestal de Catalunya
Address:
Seminari s/n, 25280 Solsona, Spain
Phone:
Fax: