Global invasive species database

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Common name
 
Synonym
Similar species
Summary
Detailed studies completed on Trechisibus antarcticus, on South Georgia indicate that a major consequence of its introductions to the Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic region, includes the considerable reduction in populations of endemic herbivorous perimylopid beetles, whose larvae form a major prey item. Carabids are thought to be restricted by the low temperatures of their habitats and are likely to be sensitive to any increase in availability of thermal energy brought about by climate warming.
Species Description
Trechisibus antarcticus is a flightless ground beetle up to 0.5 cm long and 10 mg live weight (Todd 1997).
Notes
The introductions of predatory carabid beetles such as Trechisibus antarcticus to South Georgia may provide an illustration of the potentially rapid ecosystem changes caused by the introduction of foreign species. They also provide a form of natural experiment testing ecological theories about the consequences of introducing new trophic levels into natural ecosystems which would otherwise be impossible (Convey et al. 2006a).
Habitat Description
In South Georgia, sub-Antarctica, Trechisibus antarcticus is invading the coastal lowland areas and building up local high densities in the dominant tussock-forming grass Parodiochloa flabellata (Ernsting et al. 1999). Together with an ample food supply in the form of small arthropods and beetle larvae and a vacant niche for arthropod predators, the benign microclimate of the tussock vegetation may explain the success of this and similar predator beetle introductions in South Georgia (Brandjes Block & Ernsting 1999). Compared with other habitats, tussock provides a buffered and stable thermal regime that will facilitate the spread of T. antarcticus throughout the lowland areas (Brandjes Block & Ernsting 1999).
Nutrition
Laboratory experiments have shown that the carnivorous Trechisibus antarcticus is a voracious predator, feeding on beetle larvae and other soil arthropods (Ernsting et al. 1999). T. antarcticus feeds on various mites and springtails the larvae of the herbivorous beetle Hydromedion sparsutum on South Georgia (Todd 1997).

Principal source:

Compiler: IUCN SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG) with support from the EU-funded South Atlantic Invasive Species project, coordinated by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB)

Review:

Publication date: 2009-04-27

Recommended citation: Global Invasive Species Database (2021) Species profile: Trechisibus antarcticus. Downloaded from http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=1454 on 28-09-2021.

General Impacts
In the same coastal areas in South Georgia where Trechisibus antarcticus has colonised, lives an endemic detritivorous beetle known as Hydromedion sparsutum (Perimylopidae). It is common especially in and beneath the tussock grass. The first three larval instars (stages) of H. sparsutum are easily taken prey by the carabid T. antarcticus. On sites colonised by the carabid, total abundances of larval and adult H. sparsutum are far lower (Ernsting et al. 1999).
Countries (or multi-country features) with distribution records for Trechisibus antarcticus
NATIVE RANGE
  • falkland islands (malvinas)
Informations on Trechisibus antarcticus has been recorded for the following locations. Click on the name for additional informations.
Lorem Ipsum
Location Status Invasiveness Occurrence Source
Details of Trechisibus antarcticus in information
Status
Invasiveness
Arrival date
Occurrence
Source
Introduction
Species notes for this location
Location note
Management notes for this location
Impact
Mechanism:
Outcome:
Ecosystem services:
Impact information
In the same coastal areas in South Georgia where Trechisibus antarcticus has colonised, lives an endemic detritivorous beetle known as Hydromedion sparsutum (Perimylopidae). It is common especially in and beneath the tussock grass. The first three larval instars (stages) of H. sparsutum are easily taken prey by the carabid T. antarcticus. On sites colonised by the carabid, total abundances of larval and adult H. sparsutum are far lower (Ernsting et al. 1999).
Red List assessed species 0:
Locations
SOUTH GEORGIA AND THE SOUTH SANDWICH ISLANDS
Mechanism
[1] Competition
Outcomes
[1] Environmental Ecosystem - Habitat
  • [1] Reduction in native biodiversity
Management information
Locations
SOUTH GEORGIA AND THE SOUTH SANDWICH ISLANDS
Management Category
None
Bibliography
10 references found for Trechisibus antarcticus

Management information
General information
Australian Antarctic Data Centre (AADC). Undated. Biodiversity - SCAR EBA program: Bioregions by Taxa: List of bioregions for Trechisibus antarcticus (Beetle) (profile)
Summary: Available from: http://data.aad.gov.au/aadc/biodiversity/bioRegion_By_Taxa.cfm?taxon_id=102059 [Accsessed 28 August 2008]
Bergstrom, Dana M. and Steven L. Chown. 1999. Life at the front: history, ecology and change on southern ocean islands. TREE 14 (12)
Brandjes, G.J., W. Block and G. Ernsting. 1999. Spatial dynamics of two introduced species of carabid beetles on the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia, Polar Biol 21: 326-334.
Convey, P., S.L. Chown, J. Wasley and D.M. Bergstrom 2006b. 6. Life History Traits. In: Bergstrom et al. (eds.) Trends in Antarctic Terrestrial and Limnetic Ecosystems: 101-127.
Convey, P., Y. Frenot, N. Gremmen and D.M. Bergstrom. 2006a. 10. Biological Invasions. D.M. In: Bergstrom et al. (eds.), Trends in Antarctic Terrestrial and Limnetic Ecosystems: 193-220.
Ernsting, Ger, Wil van Ginkel & Steph B.J. Menken. 1995. Genetical population structure of Trechisibus antarcticus (Coleoptera; Carabidae) on South Georgia and on the Falkland islands. Polar Biol 15: 523-525
Ernsting, G., G. J. Brandjes, W. Block, J. A. Isaaks. 1999. Life-history consequences of predation for a subantarctic beetle: evaluating the contribution of direct and indirect effects. Journal of Animal Ecology 68 (4): 741-752
Ernsting, G., W. Block, H. MacAlister & C. Todd. 1995. The invasion of the carnivorous carabid beetle Trechisibus antarcticus on South Georgia (sub-Antarctic) and its effect on the endemic herbivorous beetle Hydromedion spasutum. Oecologia 103
Frenot, Y., Chown, S.L., Whinam, J., Selkirk, P., Convey, P., Skotnicki, M., & Bergstrom, D. 2005. Biological invasions in the Antarctic: extent, impacts and implications. Bio. Rev, 80, 45-72.
Summary: Article de synth�se sur les invasions biologiques (plantes, invert�br�s et vert�br�s) en antarctique.
Available from: http://www.anta.canterbury.ac.nz/resources/non-native%20species%20in%20the%20antarctic/Talk%202%20Frenot.pdf [Accessed 4 April 2008]
Todd, C.M. 1997. Respiratory metabolism in two species of carabid beetle from the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia, Polar Biol 18: 166-171.
Contact
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Trechisibus antarcticus
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Recommended citation
(2021). Trechisibus antarcticus. IUCN Environmental Impact Classification for Alien Taxa (EICAT).