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Common name
kunyit (Malay, Malaysia), hamra (Arabic, Oman), common blue-stripe snapper (English, Papua New Guinea), nisar (Arabic, Oman), blouband snapper (Afrikaans, South Africa), common bluestripe snapper (English), kuning-kuning (Malay, Malaysia), ikan nonya (Malay, Christmas Island), bluestripe snapper (English, Christmas Island), hobara (Arabic, Saudi Arabia), gorara tikus (Malay, Indonesia), taape (English), yosuji-fuedai (Japanese, Japan), yellow and blue seaperch (English, USA), madras (French, Seychelles), blueline snapper (English), vivaneau à raies bleues (French, Djibouti, France), bluestripe seaperch (English), merah (Malay, Malaysia), blue-lined sea perch (English, French Polynesia), kunyit-kunyit (Malay, Malaysia), bluestriped snapper (English, USA), blue-banded hussar (English), tanda-tanda (Malay, Malaysia), bluebanded snapper (English, South Africa), irri ranna (Sinhalese, Sri Lanka), pargo de raios azuis (Portuguese, Mozambique), savane (Samoan, Samoa), pla kapong (Thai, Thailand), pla ka pong deng thab nam ngern (Thai, Thailand), kelea (Swahili, United Republic of Tanzania), janja (Swahili, United Republic of Tanzania), blue-lined snapper fish (English), bluelined snapper (English, Guam, Micronesia (Federated States of), Niue), pargo de rayas (Spanish), vali ranna (Sinhalese, Sri Lanka), pargo de rayas azules (Spanish, Spain), verikeechan (Tamil, Sri Lanka), tembo-uzi (Swahili, United Republic of Tanzania), mbawaa (Swahili, Kenya), common bluestriped snapper (English), naisarah (Arabic, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia), nga-wet-panni (Burmese, Myanmar), perche à raies bleues (French)
Synonym
Similar species
Lutjanus quinquelineatus
Summary
Lutjanus kasmira is a commercially important reef-associated tropical fish that has been introduced into Hawaii for fisheries. In introduced areas of Hawaii it has become abundant, forming dense schools. It may outcompete native fish for space, crowding them out of important refuge areas.
Species Description
The bluestripe snapper is bright yellow above and white below, with four blue stripes running horizontally across the sides. Fine grey stripes occur ventrally. The fins are mostly yellow (Australian Museum 2006). The male L. kasmira can reach a total maximum length of 40cm. Numbers of rays and spines are as follows: dorsal spines: 10 – 10, dorsal soft rays: 14 – 15, anal spines: 3 and anal soft rays: 7 – 8 (FishBase 2006).
Notes
The population doubling time of the bluestripe snapper is estimated to be between 1.4 and 4.4 years (FishBase 2006).
Uses
Snappers (Lutjanidae) are among the most important food fishes in the Caribbean (Munro 1983, Allen 1985, Claro 1991, in Heyman et al. 2005). The bluestripe snapper is an important commercial and gamefish species. It is also an aquarium fish (FishBase 2006).
Habitat Description
Bluestripe snapper are reef-associated tropical fish with a temperature range of 20°C to 28°C and a depth range of 3 metres to 265 metres (FishBase 2006). They inhabits coral reefs, occurring in both shallow lagoons and outer reefs and are frequently found in large aggregations around coral, caves or wrecks. Juveniles often inhabit seagrass beds around patch reefs (FishBase 2006) and as they grow move from fringe areas toward the main reef (Friedlander et al. 2002). Studies in Hawaii show that L. kasmira forms schools along the reefs’ edges during the day and forages nocturnally further away from the reef at night. This routine nightly migration leads them to forage on soft-bottomed habitat up to 100 metres from the reef-sand interface (DeFelice and Parrish 2003). In Hawaii the largest individuals occur singly or in small groups on shallow reef slopes while smaller individuals occur in larger groups on the deep slopes and in spur-and-groove habitat (Friedlander et al. 2002).
Reproduction
There is a limited understanding about the reproductive habits of snapper, particularly spawning (Heyman et al. 2005). Bluestripe snapper take part in a courtship ritual in which males use their snout to nuzzle, nudge and rub the undersides of females (Heyman et al. 2005). Pairs also dance together in spirals towards the surface (Suzuki and Kioki, 1979 in Heyman et al. 2005).
Nutrition
The bluestripe snapper feeds on shrimps, fish, stomatopods, crabs, cephalopods, and planktonic crustaceans. It also takes a variety of algae (FishBase 2006). In an Hawaiian-based study by DeFelice and Parrish (2003) the stomachs of L. kasmira (10.0–17.9cm SL) were found to contain mainly small caridean shrimps (especially Ogyrididae) as well as penaeid shrimp, small cryptic fishes, stomatopods (a type of crustacean) and portunid crabs.
Levels of piscivory (fish-eating diet) of the fish can vary with temporal changes in prey abundance. In the Great Barrier Reef, L. kasmira shifts to a more piscivorous diet during summer when the young of many species settle on the reef (John 2001). In Hawaii an estimated 40% of its diet is fish (Russo 1994).
Pathway
L. kasmira is a demersal (bottom-dwelling) species which has been translocated to new locations intentionally by humans for recreational fishing. For example it was introduced to Hawaii from French Polynesia for food and sport fishing (Friedlander et al. 2002).

Principal source: FishBase 2006 Lutjanus kasmira

Compiler: IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG) with support from La Fondation d'entreprise Total

Review: J.D. Parrish. Associate Prof. of Zoology. University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii USA

Publication date: 2007-06-05

Recommended citation: Global Invasive Species Database (2018) Species profile: Lutjanus kasmira. Downloaded from http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=1094 on 16-11-2018.

General Impacts
In Hawaii bluestripe snapper share the same habitat with native fishes such as goatfish Mulloidichthys sp. (Friedlander et al. 2002). This may result in competition for habitat use and food sources. Evidence has been documented which suggests that bluestripe snapper may displace native fish from important refuge habitat. Competition for shelter appears to be the most significant impact detected, with the dominant L. kasmira able to displace native fish from areas of the reef which offer protection (Schumacher and Parrish 2005). It has also been argued that the deliberate introduction of L. kasmira in Hawaii has lead to the replacement of many other locally important catch species (Russo 1994; FAO 2001). However this remains a controversial topic and more research investigating the ecological niche of L. kasmira is needed. Disease transmission to native fish may also occur (Work et al. 2003).
Management Info
Unable to locate any management information for this species.
Countries (or multi-country features) with distribution records for Lutjanus kasmira
NATIVE RANGE
  • american samoa
  • australia
  • bangladesh
  • british indian ocean territory
  • brunei darussalam
  • cambodia
  • china
  • christmas island
  • comoros
  • cook islands
  • djibouti
  • egypt
  • eritrea
  • fiji
  • french polynesia
  • guam
  • hong kong
  • india
  • indonesia
  • japan
  • jordan
  • kenya
  • kiribati
  • madagascar
  • malaysia
  • maldives
  • marshall islands
  • mauritius
  • micronesia, federated states of
  • mozambique
  • myanmar
  • nauru
  • new zealand
  • niue
  • norfolk island
  • northern mariana islands
  • oman
  • palau
  • papua new guinea
  • philippines
  • reunion
  • samoa
  • saudi arabia
  • seychelles
  • singapore
  • solomon islands
  • somalia
  • south africa
  • sri lanka
  • sudan
  • taiwan
  • tanzania, united republic of
  • thailand
  • timor-leste
  • tokelau
  • tonga
  • tuvalu
  • united states minor outlying islands
  • vanuatu
  • viet nam
  • wallis and futuna
  • yemen
Informations on Lutjanus kasmira has been recorded for the following locations. Click on the name for additional informations.
Lorem Ipsum
Location Status Invasiveness Occurrence Source
Details of Lutjanus kasmira in information
Status
Invasiveness
Arrival date
Occurrence
Source
Introduction
Species notes for this location
Location note
Management notes for this location
Impact
Mechanism:
Outcome:
Ecosystem services:
Impact information
In Hawaii bluestripe snapper share the same habitat with native fishes such as goatfish Mulloidichthys sp. (Friedlander et al. 2002). This may result in competition for habitat use and food sources. Evidence has been documented which suggests that bluestripe snapper may displace native fish from important refuge habitat. Competition for shelter appears to be the most significant impact detected, with the dominant L. kasmira able to displace native fish from areas of the reef which offer protection (Schumacher and Parrish 2005). It has also been argued that the deliberate introduction of L. kasmira in Hawaii has lead to the replacement of many other locally important catch species (Russo 1994; FAO 2001). However this remains a controversial topic and more research investigating the ecological niche of L. kasmira is needed. Disease transmission to native fish may also occur (Work et al. 2003).
Red List assessed species 0:
Locations
UNITED STATES
UNITED STATES MINOR OUTLYING ISLANDS
Mechanism
[5] Competition
[1] Predation
[1] Disease transmission
Outcomes
[3] Environmental Ecosystem - Habitat
  • [3] Reduction in native biodiversity
[1] Socio-Economic
  • [1] Damage on aquaculture/mariculture/fishery
Management information
Unable to locate any management information for this species.
Bibliography
24 references found for Lutjanus kasmira

Managment information
Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science (CEFAS)., 2008. Decision support tools-Identifying potentially invasive non-native marine and freshwater species: fish, invertebrates, amphibians.
Summary: The electronic tool kits made available on the Cefas page for free download are Crown Copyright (2007-2008). As such, these are freeware and may be freely distributed provided this notice is retained. No warranty, expressed or implied, is made and users should satisfy themselves as to the applicability of the results in any given circumstance. Toolkits available include 1) FISK- Freshwater Fish Invasiveness Scoring Kit (English and Spanish language version); 2) MFISK- Marine Fish Invasiveness Scoring Kit; 3) MI-ISK- Marine invertebrate Invasiveness Scoring Kit; 4) FI-ISK- Freshwater Invertebrate Invasiveness Scoring Kit and AmphISK- Amphibian Invasiveness Scoring Kit. These tool kits were developed by Cefas, with new VisualBasic and computational programming by Lorenzo Vilizzi, David Cooper, Andy South and Gordon H. Copp, based on VisualBasic code in the original Weed Risk Assessment (WRA) tool kit of P.C. Pheloung, P.A. Williams & S.R. Halloy (1999).
The decision support tools are available from: http://cefas.defra.gov.uk/our-science/ecosystems-and-biodiversity/non-native-species/decision-support-tools.aspx [Accessed 13 October 2011]
The guidance document is available from http://www.cefas.co.uk/media/118009/fisk_guide_v2.pdf [Accessed 13 January 2009].
Mendoza, R.E.; Cudmore, B.; Orr, R.; Balderas, S.C.; Courtenay, W.R.; Osorio, P.K.; Mandrak, N.; Torres, P.A.; Damian, M.A.; Gallardo, C.E.; Sanguines, A.G.; Greene, G.; Lee, D.; Orbe-Mendoza, A.; Martinez, C.R.; and Arana, O.S. 2009. Trinational Risk Assessment Guidelines for Aquatic Alien Invasive Species. Commission for Environmental Cooperation. 393, rue St-Jacques Ouest, Bureau 200, Montr�al (Qu�bec), Canada. ISBN 978-2-923358-48-1.
Summary: In 1993, Canada, Mexico and the United States signed the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation (NAAEC) as a side agreement to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The NAAEC established the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) to help the Parties ensure that improved economic efficiency occurred simultaneously with trinational environmental cooperation. The NAAEC highlighted biodiversity as a key area for trinational cooperation. In 2001, the CEC adopted a resolution (Council Resolution 01-03), which created the Biodiversity Conservation Working Group (BCWG), a working group of high-level policy makers from Canada, Mexico and the United States. In 2003, the BCWG produced the �Strategic Plan for North American Cooperation in the Conservation of Biodiversity.� This strategy identified responding to threats, such as invasive species, as a priority action area. In 2004, the BCWG, recognizing the importance of prevention in addressing invasive species, agreed to work together to develop the draft CEC Risk Assessment Guidelines for Aquatic Alien Invasive Species (hereafter referred to as the Guidelines). These Guidelines will serve as a tool to North American resource managers who are evaluating whether or not to introduce a non-native species into a new ecosystem. Through this collaborative process, the BCWG has begun to implement its strategy as well as address an important trade and environment issue. With increased trade comes an increase in the potential for economic growth as well as biological invasion, by working to minimize the potential adverse impacts from trade, the CEC Parties are working to maximize the gains from trade while minimizing the environmental costs.
Available from: English version: http://www.cec.org/Storage/62/5516_07-64-CEC%20invasives%20risk%20guidelines-full-report_en.pdf [Accessed 15 June 2010]
French version: http://www.cec.org/Storage/62/5517_07-64-CEC%20invasives%20risk%20guidelines-full-report_fr.pdf [Accessed 15 June 2010]
Spanish version: http://www.cec.org/Storage/62/5518_07-64-CEC%20invasives%20risk%20guidelines-full-report_es.pdf [Accessed 15 June 2010].
General information
Australian Museum. 2006. Bluestripe Seaperch: Lutjanus kasmira (Forssk�l, 1775).
Summary: Brief description of the fish and distribution in Australia.
Available from: http://www.amonline.net.au/FISHES/fishfacts/fish/lkasmira.htm [Accessed 12 January 2007]
Cook Islands Biodiversity and Natural Heritage. 2005. Lutjanus kasmira: Bluelined Snapper. Retrieved 3 January 2007, from The Cook Islands Natural Heritage Trust Biodiversity database.
Summary: This multimedia database is designed to integrate both scientific and traditional information on Cook Islands flora and fauna.
Available from: http://cookislands.bishopmuseum.org/species.asp?id=8577 [Accessed 3 January 2007]
DeFelice, R.C. and Parrish, J.D. 2003. Importance of benthic prey for fishes in coral reef-associated sediments, Pacific Science 57(4): 359-384.
Summary: This study discusses the important trophic role for the sandy habitat adjacent to coral reefs as a food source for fishes.
Available from: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/pacific_science/v057/57.4defelice.pdf [Accessed 10 January 2007]
DeFelice, RC., Coles, S.L., Muir, D. and Eldredge, L.G. 1998. Investigation of the marine communities of Midway Harbor and Adjacent Lagoon, Midway Atoll, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Hawaiian Biological Survey, Bishop Museum: Honolulu.
Summary: This marine community survey was conducted in 1997 in Midway Atoll harbor and the surrounding lagoon.
Available from: http://hbs.bishopmuseum.org/pdf/defelice-etal98.pdf [Accessed 3 January 2007]
Emata, A.C. 2003. Reproductive performance in induced and spontaneous spawning of the mangrove red snapper, Lutjanus argentimaculatus: a potential candidate species for sustainable aquaculture, Aquaculture Research 34: 849-857.
Summary: This paper discusses a reliable breeding technique for mangrove red snapper, Lutjanus argentimaculatus, an immensely popular acquaculture species in Southeast Asia.
FishBase, 2006. Species profile: Lutjanus kasmira. Retrieved 29 December 2006, from FishBase.
Summary: FishBase is a global information system with all you ever wanted to know about fishes . Species are searchable by a number of criteria including country.
Available from: http://www.fishbase.org/Summary/speciesSummary.php?ID=156&genusname=Lutjanus&speciesname=kasmira [Accessed 29 December 2006]
Friedlander, A.M., Parrish, J.D. and Defelice, R.C. 2002. Ecology of the introduced snapper Lutjanus kasmira (Forsskal) in the reef fish assemblage of a Hawaiian bay, Journal of Fish Biology 60(1): 28-48.
Summary: Includes ecological information and adaptations of L. kasmira in a shallow bay in Kauai, Hawaii.
Godwin, L.S. 2003. Hull Fouling of Maritime Vessels as a Pathway for Marine Species Invasions to the Hawaiian Islands, Biofouling 19 (Supplement): 123�131.
Summary: A case study of a maritime vessel hull fouling as a mode of dispersal.
Heyman, W.D., Kjerfve, B., Graham, R.T., Rhodes, K.L. and Garbutt, L. 2005. Spawning aggregations of Lutjanus cyanopterus (Cuvier) on the Belize Barrier Reef over a 6 year period, Journal of Fish Biology 67: 83-101.
Summary: This study looks at cubera snapper (Lutjanus cyanopterus) spawning events at Gladden Spit Marine Reserve (Belize).
ITIS (Integrated Taxonomic Information System), 2005. Online Database Lutjanus kasmira
Summary: An online database that provides taxonomic information, common names, synonyms and geographical jurisdiction of a species. In addition links are provided to retrieve biological records and collection information from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) Data Portal and bioscience articles from BioOne journals.
Available from: http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=168862 [Accessed 8 December 2006]
John, J.St. 2001. Temporal variation in the diet of a coral reef piscivore (Pisces: Serranidae) was not seasonal, Coral Reefs 20: 163-170.
Summary: This paper discusses the temporal variation in the diet of a few coral reef piscivore species (focus on Serranidae) .
Oda, D. K. & Parrish, J. D. 1982. Ecology of commercial snappers and groupers introduced to Hawaiian reefs. In Proceedings of the Fourth International Coral Reef Symposium Vol. 1 (Gomez, E. D., Birkeland, C. E., Buddemeier, R. W., Johannes, R. E., Marsh, J. A. Jr & Tsuda, R. T., eds), pp. 59�67. Quezon City, Philippines: Marine Sciences Center, University of the Philippines.
Russo, A.R. 1994. A Survey of Selected Coral and Fish Assemblages Near the Waianae Ocean Outfall, Oahu, Hawaii, 1994.
Summary: This survey looks at coral growth status and fish abundance at stations in and near Waianae Ocean Outfall in Oahu (Hawaii, USA).
Available from: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/iel3/4054/11612/00528537.pdf?isnumber=&arnumber=528537 [Accessed 9 January 2007]
Schumacher, B.D. and Parrish, J.D. 2005. Spatial relationships between an introduced snapper and native goatfishes on Hawaiian reefs, Biological Invasions 7: 925-933.
Summary: This study investigates the spatial competition between the introduced blueline snapper L. kasmira and the native yellowtail goatfish Mulloidichthys vanicolensis.
Tessier, E., Chabanet, P., Pothin, K., Soria, M. and Lasserre, G. 2005. Visual censuses of tropical fish aggregations on artificial reefs: slate versus video recording techniques, Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 315: 17-30.
Summary: This study, conducted at artificial reef sites in Reunion Island, was designed to test slate and video recording visual techniques to determine which would be most suitable for sampling in such sites.
UNEP-WCMC (United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre). 2007. Lutjanus kasmira - Distribution. Retrieved 3 January 2007, from UNEP-WCMC Species Database.
Summary: The UNEP-WCMC species database contains information on species with important conservational value. This page details the distribution of L. kasmira.
Available from: http://sea.unep-wcmc.org/isdb/Taxonomy/tax-species-result.cfm?displaylanguage=eng&Genus=Lutjanus&Species=kasmira&source=animals&Country= [Accessed 3 January 2007]
UNEP-WCMC (United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre). 2007. Lutjanus kasmira - Names. Retrieved 3 January 2007, from UNEP-WCMC Species Database.
Summary: The UNEP-WCMC species database contains information on species with important conservational value. This page lists the common names of L. kasmira.
Available from: http://sea.unep-wcmc.org/isdb/Taxonomy/tax-species-result.cfm?displaylanguage=eng&Genus=Lutjanus&Species=kasmira&source=animals&Country= [Accessed 3 January 2007]
USGS (United States Geological Survey). 2005. Lutjanus kasmira. Retrieved 8 January 2007, from USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database.
Summary: Details of L. kasmira distribution in the USA.
Available from: http://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/CollectionInfo.asp?SpeciesID=774& [Accessed 8 January 2007]
Work, T.M., Rameyer, R.A., Takata, G. and Kent, M.L. 2003. Protozoal and epitheliocystis-like infections in the introduced bluestripe snapper Lutjanus kasmira in Hawaii, Diseases of Aquatic Organisms 57: 59-66
Summary: A paper which addresses a study of the impact of introduced microbial organisms on native Hawaiian fauna. It takes the example of L. kasmira (introduced species) infected by an apicomplexan protozoan.
Available from: http://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/hfs/Globals/Products/TaapeDAO(57)59-66.pdf [Accessed 29 December 2006]
Contact
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