Global invasive species database

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Common name
false mussel (English), Caribbean black-striped mussel (English, Australia), Caribbean black-striped false mussel (English, Australia), caliche (Spanish, Venezuela), Santo Domingo false mussel (English), black striped mussel (English)
Synonym
Congeria gundlachi , Dall, 1898
Congeria rossmasessleri , Dall, 1898
Congeria sallei , Dall, 1898
Dreissena domingensis , Reculuz, 1852
Dreissena gundlachi , Fischer, 1858
Dreissena morchiana , Fischer, 1858
Dreissena pfeiferi , Fischer, 1858
Dreissena riisei , Dunker, 1855
Dreissena roosmassleri , Fischer, 1858
Dreissena sallei , Recluz, 1849
Dreissenia domingensis , Dunker, 1855
Dreissenia gundlachii , Dunker, 1855
Dreissenia moerchiana , Dunker, 1855
Dreissenia pfeifferi , Dunker, 1855
Dreissenia rossmaessleri , Dunker, 1855
Dreissenia sallei , Dunker, 1855
Mytilopsis allyneana , Hertlein and Hanna, 1949
Mytilus domningensis , Reeve, 1858
Mytilus morchianus , Reeve, 1858
Mytilus rossmassleri , Reeve, 1858
Mytilus sallei , Reeve, 1858
Tichogonia domingensis , Kuster, 1889
Tichogonia gundlachi , Kuster, 1889
Tichogonia moerchiana , Kuster, 1889
Tichogonia pfiefferi , Dunker, 1853
Tichogonia riisei , Dunker, 1853
Tichogonia rossmassleri , Dunker, 1853
Tichogonia sallei , Dunker, 1853
Similar species
Dreissena polymorpha, Mytilopsis leucophaeata, Dreissena bugensis, Brachidontes
Summary
Mytilopsis sallei, commonly known as the black striped mussel, is an opportunistic r-strategist mussel species, which is found in intertidal and shallow waters. It has similar impacts to the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha. Mytilopsis sallei is a major fouling species, forming dense monocultures which can lead to a substantial reduction in biodiversity.
Species Description
Mytilopsis sallei is a small, fingernail sized mussel, growing to an average size of 25mm, although sizes range from lengths of 8-25mm, with a maximum width of 9.68mm and a maximum height of 12.58mm. It has a varied shell colouration, from black through to a light colour, with some small individuals having a light and dark zig-zag pattern. The right valve overlaps the left valve, and is slightly larger. M. sallei settles in clusters, and is rarely seen as a single individual (NIMPIS, 2002).
Lifecycle Stages
Juveniles grow rapidly, and are considered mature after one month. Maximum size is reached within six months, and mussels live for about 12-13 (max 20) months. M. sallei is ambi-sexual and individual mussels change sex at some stage during their lifetime (NIMPIS, 2002; CSIRO, 2001).
Habitat Description
Mytilopsis sallei has wide temperature, salinity and oxygen tolerances. It also possesses a fast rate of growth, high fecundity and matures early. In its native habitat, M. sallei is a colonial surface dweller of sheltered waters, for example, shallow coastal lagoons. In its introduced habitat, it is found in intertidal and shallow waters, at a range of temperatures (10-35°C) and salinities (0-27 ppt), and preferring disturbed habitats and often settling on man-made structures. It has not been found any deeper than a few metres. It prefers to settle on vertical surfaces and objects, but is found on all types of substrata. It is capable of shedding its byssus and reattaching to new surfaces - younger mussels develop byssus apparatus at shorter intervals, and hence move more often, but adults are relatively passive (NIMPIS, 2002; CSIRO, 2001; Udhayakumar and Karande, 1989; Morton, 1981; Bax et al. 2002).
Reproduction
Mytilopsis sallei has high fecundity, rapid growth and a fast maturity rate. During their lifespan, individuals change sex, with a proportion of mussels in any population present as hermaphrodites. Eggs and sperm are spawned into the water column, where external fertilisation takes place. Tens of thousands of eggs can be released. Spawning appears to be triggered by changes in salinity - in its native range M. sallei has two periods of intense spawning activity apparently stimulated by rapid drops in salinity resulting from seasonal freshwater outflow (Puyana, 1995; in Bax et al. 2002). A pelagic larva develops within a day of fertilisation and then settles (NIMPIS, 2002; CSIRO, 2001).
Nutrition
Mytilopsis sallei is a suspension feeder, feeding on zooplankton, phytoplankton and other suspended particulate organic matter (NIMPIS, 2002).
Pathway
Hull fouling is often an important factor in incursions, such as the introduction of M. sallei to Darwin Harbour, Australia in the 1990s (Hutchings et al. 2002).Spread via ballast water appears less likely because of the short duration of the larval stage (CSIRO, 2001).

Principal source: NIMPIS. 2002. Mytilopsis sallei species summary. National Introduced Marine Pest Information System

Compiler: IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG) with support from La Fondation d'entreprise Total

Review:

Publication date: 2007-01-09

Recommended citation: Global Invasive Species Database (2018) Species profile: Mytilopsis sallei. Downloaded from http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=1047 on 16-11-2018.

General Impacts
Mytilopsis sallei is an extremely prolific and fecund species, being ecologically similar to its relation the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha. It has been responsible for massive fouling on wharves and marinas, seawater systems (pumping stations, vessel ballast and cooling systems) and marine farms. In preferred habitats, it forms dense monospecific groups that exclude most other species, leading to a substantial reduction in biodiversity in infected areas (NIMPIS, 2002; CSIRO, 2001).
Management Info
McEnnulty et al. (2002) suggest eight possible methods for the control of M. sallei in the The Web-Based Rapid Reponse Toolbox: antifoulants (TBT and novel modern coatings), air exposure/dessication/freezing, changes to salinity, oxygen deprivation, copper compounds, endosulfan/endosulphan, chlorine or hydrocarbons.
Countries (or multi-country features) with distribution records for Mytilopsis sallei
ALIEN RANGE
NATIVE RANGE
  • atlantic - western central
  • guatemala
  • united states
  • west indies
Informations on Mytilopsis sallei has been recorded for the following locations. Click on the name for additional informations.
Lorem Ipsum
Location Status Invasiveness Occurrence Source
Details of Mytilopsis sallei in information
Status
Invasiveness
Arrival date
Occurrence
Source
Introduction
Species notes for this location
Location note
Management notes for this location
Impact
Mechanism:
Outcome:
Ecosystem services:
Impact information
Mytilopsis sallei is an extremely prolific and fecund species, being ecologically similar to its relation the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha. It has been responsible for massive fouling on wharves and marinas, seawater systems (pumping stations, vessel ballast and cooling systems) and marine farms. In preferred habitats, it forms dense monospecific groups that exclude most other species, leading to a substantial reduction in biodiversity in infected areas (NIMPIS, 2002; CSIRO, 2001).
Red List assessed species 0:
Locations
Mechanism
[1] Competition
Outcomes
[2] Environmental Ecosystem - Habitat
  • [1] Reduction in native biodiversity
  • [1] Unspecified ecosystem modification
Management information
McEnnulty et al. (2002) suggest eight possible methods for the control of M. sallei in the The Web-Based Rapid Reponse Toolbox: antifoulants (TBT and novel modern coatings), air exposure/dessication/freezing, changes to salinity, oxygen deprivation, copper compounds, endosulfan/endosulphan, chlorine or hydrocarbons.
Locations
AUSTRALIA
Management Category
Eradication
Bibliography
16 references found for Mytilopsis sallei

Managment information
Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science (CEFAS)., 2008. Decision support tools-Identifying potentially invasive non-native marine and freshwater species: fish, invertebrates, amphibians.
Summary: The electronic tool kits made available on the Cefas page for free download are Crown Copyright (2007-2008). As such, these are freeware and may be freely distributed provided this notice is retained. No warranty, expressed or implied, is made and users should satisfy themselves as to the applicability of the results in any given circumstance. Toolkits available include 1) FISK- Freshwater Fish Invasiveness Scoring Kit (English and Spanish language version); 2) MFISK- Marine Fish Invasiveness Scoring Kit; 3) MI-ISK- Marine invertebrate Invasiveness Scoring Kit; 4) FI-ISK- Freshwater Invertebrate Invasiveness Scoring Kit and AmphISK- Amphibian Invasiveness Scoring Kit. These tool kits were developed by Cefas, with new VisualBasic and computational programming by Lorenzo Vilizzi, David Cooper, Andy South and Gordon H. Copp, based on VisualBasic code in the original Weed Risk Assessment (WRA) tool kit of P.C. Pheloung, P.A. Williams & S.R. Halloy (1999).
The decision support tools are available from: http://cefas.defra.gov.uk/our-science/ecosystems-and-biodiversity/non-native-species/decision-support-tools.aspx [Accessed 13 October 2011]
The guidance document is available from http://www.cefas.co.uk/media/118009/fisk_guide_v2.pdf [Accessed 13 January 2009].
General information
Anil, A.C., Venkat, K., Sawant, S.S., Dileepkumar, M., Dhargalkar, V.K., Ramaiah, N., Harkantra, S.N. and Ansari, Z.A. 2002. Marine bioinvasion: Concern for ecology and shipping. Current Science. 83 (3): 214-218.
Summary: This paper reports on invasions of marine species, both in India and around the world.
Chu, K.H., Tam, P.F., Fung, C.H. and Chen, Q.C. 1997. A biological survey of ballast water in container ships entering Hong Kong. Hydrobiologia. 352: 201-206.
Summary: This paper discusses the species which have arrived in Hong Kong via ballast water in container ships.
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), 2001. Black-striped mussel, Mytilopsis sallei. Marine pest information sheet 10.
Summary: This information sheet provides basic information about M. sallei.
Available from: http://www.marine.csiro.au/crimp/Reports/Infosht10_Mytil0201S3.pdf [Accessed 29 November 2006]
Hewitt, C.L. 2002. Distribution and biodiversity of Australian tropical marine bioinvasions. Pacific Science. 56 (2): 213-222.
Summary: This paper discusses the invasive marine species found in Australia, including M. sallei.
Hutchings, P.A., Hilliard, R.W. and Coles, S.L. 2002. Species introductions and potential for marine pest invasions into tropical marine communities, with special reference to the Indo-Pacific (1). Pacific Science. 56 (2): 223.
Summary: This paper discusses marine invasions in the Pacific region, and includes references to M. sallei.
Kimura, T. and Horii, N. 2004. Mytilopsis sallei (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae) introduced into Ise Bay. Chiribotan. 35 (2): 37-43.
Summary: This paper outlines the introduction of M. sallei to Ise Bay in Japan.
Marelli, D.C. and Berrend, R.E. 1978. Mytilopsis sallei new record in Central America. Mollusca Pelecypoda. Veliger. 21 (1): 144.
Summary: This paper reports a new record for M. sallei in Mexico.
Mohan, P.C. and Prakash, R.R. 1998. Concentration of petroleum hydrocarbons in bivalve Mytilopsis sallei and in the harbour waters of Visakhapatnam, east coast of India. Indian Journal of Marine Sciences. 27 (3-4): 496-498.
Summary: This paper examines the effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on M. sallei in Visakhapatnam Harbour in India.
Morton, B. 1981. The biology and functional morphology of Mytilopsis sallei Bivalvia Dreissenacea fouling Visakhapatnam Harbor, Andhra Pradesh India.
Summary: This paper discusses the morphology of M. sallei in Visakhapatnam Harbour in India.
Morton, B. 1989. Life-history characteristics and sexual strategy of Mytilopsis sallei (Bivalvia: Dreissenacea), introduced into Hong Kong. Journal of Zoology. 219 (3): 469-485.
Summary: This paper provides a great deal of information about the life history of M. sallei in Hong Kong.
Sin, Y.M., Wong, M.K., Chou, L.M. and Alias, N.B. 1991. A study of the heavy metal concentrations of the Singapore River. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment. 19: 481-494.
Summary: This paper reports on the species present in the Singapore River subsequent to attempts to clean up pollution in the river.
Subba Rao, D.V. 2005. Comprehensive review of the records of the biota of the Indian Seas and introduction of non-indigenous species. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems. 15: 117-146.
Summary: This paper provides information about the invasive marine species in Indian waters.
Udhayakumar, M. and Karande, A.A. 1989. Byssal threads of Mytilopsis sallei Recluz and their adhesive strength. Proceedings of the Indian Academy of Sciences Animal Sciences. 98 (1): 65-76.
Summary: This paper discusses details of the byssal threads of M. sallei.
Contact
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